See also: Herd

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

 
A herd of sheep.

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English herde, heerde, heorde, from Old English hierd, heord (herd, flock; keeping, care, custody), from Proto-West Germanic *herdu, from Proto-Germanic *herdō (herd), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱerdʰ- (file, row, herd). Cognate with German Herde, Swedish hjord. Non-Germanic cognates include Albanian herdhe (nest) and Serbo-Croatian krdo.

NounEdit

herd (plural herds)

  1. A number of domestic animals assembled together under the watch or ownership of a keeper. [from 11th c.]
    a herd of cattle
    a herd of sheep
    a herd of goats
  2. Any collection of animals gathered or travelling in a company. [from 13th c.]
    • 2007, J. Michael Fay, Ivory Wars: Last Stand in Zakouma, National Geographic (March 2007), 47,
      Zakouma is the last place on Earth where you can see more than a thousand elephants on the move in a single, compact herd.
  3. (now usually derogatory) A crowd, a mass of people; now usually pejorative: a rabble. [from 15th c.]
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

herd (third-person singular simple present herds, present participle herding, simple past and past participle herded)

  1. (intransitive) To unite or associate in a herd; to feed or run together, or in company.
    Sheep herd on many hills.
    • 1953, Janice Holt Giles, The Kentuckians:
      The women bunched up in little droves and let their tongues clack, and the men herded together and passed a jug around and, to tell the truth, let their tongues clack too.
    • 1983, Richard Ellis, The Book of Sharks, Knopf, →ISBN, page 167:
      Any predator that preys on animals that herd or school, has to be able to single out one individual to attack.
  2. (transitive) To unite or associate in a herd
  3. (transitive) To manage, care for or guard a herd
    He is employed to herd the goats.
  4. (intransitive) To associate; to ally oneself with, or place oneself among, a group or company.
    1713, Joseph Addison, Cato, published 1712, (please specify the act number in uppercase Roman numerals):
    • I’ll herd among his friends, and seem
      One of the number.
    • 1887, H. Rider Haggard, She: A History of Adventure[1]:
      "[W]hy, I say, oh stranger, dost thou think that I herd here with barbarians lower than the beasts?"
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English herde, from Old English hirde, hierde, from Proto-West Germanic *hirdī, from Proto-Germanic *hirdijaz. Cognate with German Hirte, Swedish herde, Danish hyrde.

NounEdit

herd (plural herds)

  1. (now rare) Someone who keeps a group of domestic animals; a herdsman.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      John Dodds, the herd who bode in the place, was standing at the door, and he looked to see who was on the road so late.
    • 2000, Alasdair Grey, The Book of Prefaces, Bloomsbury 2002, page 38:
      Any talent which gives a good new thing to others is a miracle, but commentators have thought it extra miraculous that England's first known poet was an illiterate herd.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

herd (third-person singular simple present herds, present participle herding, simple past and past participle herded)

  1. (intransitive, Scotland) To act as a herdsman or a shepherd.
  2. (transitive) To form or put into a herd.
  3. (transitive) To move or drive a herd.
    I heard the herd of cattle being herded home from a long way away.
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

herd

  1. Alternative form of herde (herd)

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

herd

  1. Alternative form of herde (herder)

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

herd

  1. Alternative form of hird (household)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

VerbEdit

herd

  1. imperative of herde

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse herðr.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

herd f (definite singular herda, indefinite plural herdar or herder, definite plural herdane or herdene)

  1. shoulder
    Synonyms: skulder, aksel

Etymology 2Edit

Alternative formsEdit

ParticipleEdit

herd (neuter herdt, definite singular and plural herde)

  1. past participle of herde

ReferencesEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *herþ.

NounEdit

herd m

  1. hearth

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle High German: hert