accessus

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin accessus. Doublet of access.

NounEdit

accessus (uncountable)

  1. (Christianity, historical) In electing a pope, a method by which cardinals could change their most recent vote to accede to another candidate in an attempt to reach the necessary two-thirds majority and end the conclave.

LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Perfect participle of accēdō (I approach, advance).

ParticipleEdit

accessus (feminine accessa, neuter accessum); first/second-declension participle

  1. approached, reached
  2. advanced, attacked
DeclensionEdit

First/second-declension adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative accessus accessa accessum accessī accessae accessa
Genitive accessī accessae accessī accessōrum accessārum accessōrum
Dative accessō accessō accessīs
Accusative accessum accessam accessum accessōs accessās accessa
Ablative accessō accessā accessō accessīs
Vocative accesse accessa accessum accessī accessae accessa

Etymology 2Edit

From accēdō (I approach, advance) +‎ -tus (forms nouns from verbs designating the result of an action).

NounEdit

accessus m (genitive accessūs); fourth declension

  1. approach, arrival
  2. entry, admittance, audience
  3. onset
DeclensionEdit

Fourth-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative accessus accessūs
Genitive accessūs accessuum
Dative accessuī accessibus
Accusative accessum accessūs
Ablative accessū accessibus
Vocative accessus accessūs
DescendantsEdit
  • Catalan: accés
  • English: access
  • French: accès
  • Galician: acceso
  • Italian: accesso
  • Occitan: accès
  • Portuguese: acesso
  • Spanish: acceso

ReferencesEdit