Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

First attested in the mid 15th century. From Middle English accusative, and from Anglo-Norman accusatif, from Middle French acusatif or from Latin accūsātīvus(of blaming), from accūsō(to blame). Akin to accuse. The Latin form is a mistranslation of the Ancient Greek grammatical term αἰτιᾱτική(aitiātikḗ, expressing an effect). This term actually comes from αἰτιᾱτός(aitiātós, caused) +‎ -ῐκός(-ikós, adjective suffix), but was reanalyzed as coming from αἰτιᾱ-(aitiā-), the stem of the verb αἰτιάομαι(aitiáomai, to blame), + -τῐκός(-tikós, verbal adjective suffix).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /əˈkjuːzətɪv/
  • (US) IPA(key): /əˈkjuzətɪv/
  • Hyphenation: ac‧cusa‧tive
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

accusative ‎(comparative more accusative, superlative most accusative)

  1. Producing accusations; accusatory; accusatorial; in a manner that reflects a finding of fault or blame
  2. (grammar) Applied to the case (as the fourth case of Latin, Lithuanian and Greek nouns) which expresses the immediate object on which the action or influence of a transitive verb has its limited influence. Other parts of speech, including secondary or predicate direct objects, will also influence a sentence’s construction. In German the case used for direct objects.

TranslationsEdit

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NounEdit

accusative ‎(plural accusatives)

  1. (grammar) The accusative case.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

accusative

  1. feminine singular of accusatif

LatinEdit

NounEdit

accūsātīve

  1. vocative singular of accūsātīvus