EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From adore +‎ -er.

NounEdit

adorer (plural adorers)

  1. Someone who adores.
    1. Someone who worships.
      Synonyms: devotee, worshipper
    2. Someone who has a deep admiration, fondness or love (of someone or something).
      • c. 1609,, William Shakespeare, Cymbeline, Act I, Scene 4,[4]
        [] I profess myself her adorer, not her friend.
      • 1732, George Berkeley, Alciphron, Dublin: G. Risk et al., Volume 2, Dialogue 6, Chapter 32, p. 83,[5]
        I who profess my self an Admirer, an Adorer of Reason, am obliged to own, that in some Cases the Sharpness of Ridicule can do more than the Strength of Argument.
      • 1871, W. S. Gilbert, “Old Paul and Old Tim” in More “Bab” Ballads, London: Routledge, 1892, p. 164,[6]
        When rival adorers come courting a maid,
        There’s something or other may often be said,
        Why he should be pitched upon rather than him.
        This wasn’t the case with Old PAUL and Old TIM.
      • 2004, Alan Hollinghurst, The Line of Beauty, London: Picador, Chapter 13, p. 403,[7]
        The funny thing was that all the envelopes were addressed in the same hand, in green or sometimes purple capitals. It was like one crazed adorer laying siege to Leo.
      Synonym: admirer

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ador +‎ -er

AdjectiveEdit

adorer (feminine adorera, masculine plural adorers, feminine plural adoreres)

  1. Ador (Valencia, Spain) (attributive), of Ador, from Ador

NounEdit

adorer m (plural adorers, feminine adorera)

  1. a person from, or an inhabitant of Ador, Valencia, Spain

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French adorer, borrowed from Latin adōrō, adōrāre.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /a.dɔ.ʁe/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

adorer

  1. to love, to adore
  2. (religion) to worship

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Haitian Creole: adore

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

adōrer

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of adōrō

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin adōrō, adōrāre. Doublet of aorer. The -d- was re-introduced from influence from Ecclesiastical Latin.

VerbEdit

adorer

  1. (chiefly Christianity) to praise (usually God)

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

DescendantsEdit