afflict

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French aflicter, from Latin afflictare (to damage, harass, torment), frequentative of affligere (to dash down, overthrow).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /əˈflɪkt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪkt
  • Hyphenation: af‧flict

VerbEdit

afflict (third-person singular simple present afflicts, present participle afflicting, simple past and past participle afflicted)

  1. (transitive) To cause (someone) pain, suffering or distress.
  2. (obsolete) To strike or cast down; to overthrow.
  3. (obsolete) To make low or humble.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Edmund Spenser to this entry?)
    • 1650, Jeremy Taylor, The Rule and Exercises of Holy Living
      Men are apt to prefer a prosperous error before an afflicted truth.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

afflict (third-person singular present afflicts, present participle afflictin, past afflictit, past participle afflictit)

  1. to afflict

ReferencesEdit