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See also: Alabaster

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EnglishEdit

 
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A lamp whose shade has been crafted from alabaster.

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Old French alabastre, from Latin alabaster (box for perfume made of alabaster), from Ancient Greek ἀλάβαστρος (alábastros), from earlier ἀλάβαστος (alábastos, vase made of alabaster). This may further derive from Egyptian ꜥj-r-bꜣstjt (vessel of the Egyptian goddess Bast). The Latin suffix -aster is unrelated, but may have influenced the spelling of the borrowing from Ancient Greek (whence a direct loan could have been rendered as *alabastrus).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

alabaster (usually uncountable, plural alabasters)

  1. A fine-grained white or lightly-tinted variety of gypsum, used ornamentally.
  2. (historical) A variety of calcite, translucent and sometimes banded.

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

alabaster (not comparable)

  1. Made of alabaster
    The crown is stored in an alabaster box with an onyx handle and a gold lock.
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Mark 14:3
      And being in Bethany, in the house of Simon the leper, as he sat at meat, there came a woman having an alabaster box of ointment of spikenard very precious; and she brake the box, and poured it on his head.
    • 1980, Colin Thubron, Seafarers: The Venetians, page 41:
      An enameled miniature of Christ is set in the center of a jeweled alabaster paten, the plate that holds the bread during Communion services.
  2. Resembling alabaster: white, pale, translucent.
    An ominous alabaster fog settled in the valley.
    • 1594, William Shakespeare, "The Rape of Lucrece", lines 418-420
      With more than admiration he admir’d
      Her azure veins, her alabaster skin,
      Her coral lips, her snow-white dimpled chin.
    • before 1887, Emily Dickinson, "Safe in Their Alabaster Chambers"
      Safe in their alabaster chambers
      Untouched by morning, untouched by noon
      Sleep the meek members of the resurrection,
      Rafters of satin, and roof of stone.
    • 1895, Katherine Lee Bates, "America the Beautiful"
      Thy alabaster cities gleam
      Undimmed by human tears!

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Ancient Greek ἀλάβαστρος (alábastros), from earlier ἀλάβαστος (alábastos, vase made of alabaster).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

alabaster m (genitive alabastrī); second declension

  1. a box, tapering to a point at the top, for perfumes or unguents

InflectionEdit

Second declension, nominative singular in -er.

Case Singular Plural
nominative alabaster alabastrī
genitive alabastrī alabastrōrum
dative alabastrō alabastrīs
accusative alabastrum alabastrōs
ablative alabastrō alabastrīs
vocative alabaster1 alabastrī

1May also be alabastre.

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
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EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin alabster.

NounEdit

alabaster m inan

  1. alabaster

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin alabster.

NounEdit

alabaster m (Cyrillic spelling алабастер)

  1. alabaster

SynonymsEdit