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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

In imitation of a cry. Used since at least the 18th century.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɑɹː/, /ɑɹɡ/ growled /ɹ/ (♪: ╰— )
  • (file)

InterjectionEdit

argh

  1. (onomatopoeia) Expressing annoyance, dismay, embarrassment or frustration.
    Argh! Itʼs already 7:15! Weʼre never gonna make it!
TranslationsEdit

Usage notesEdit

Any of the letters may be reduplicated, e.g. Arrggh!, Aaaarrrggghhh!

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English argh, from Old English earg (inert; weak; timid; cowardly). Cognate with Scots ergh, argh, arch, erf (timid; reluctant; unwilling). More at eerie.

AdjectiveEdit

argh (comparative more argh, superlative most argh)

  1. (dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) timid; cowardly

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ “argh” in Christine A. Lindberg, editor, The Oxford College Dictionary, 2nd edition, New York, N.Y.: Spark Publishing, 2002, →ISBN, page 1.

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English earg, from Proto-Germanic *argaz.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /arx/, /ˈarɛu̯/, /ˈarɔu̯/

AdjectiveEdit

argh

  1. afraid, scared, courageless
  2. scared, fearful, worried
  3. base, wretched, lowly; worthy of contempt or ostracism.
  4. slothful, unwilling, tired; lacking in energy or motivation.
  5. Lacking in power or strength.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Scots: ergh, erfe, erf
  • English: argh (dialectal)

ReferencesEdit

AdverbEdit

argh

  1. amazedly; with a feeling of wonder.

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

InterjectionEdit

argh

  1. (onomatopoeia) argh (expression of annoyance)