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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English erfe, erve, from Old English yrfe, ierfe ‎(heritage, bequest, inheritance, property, inherited property, property that passes to an heir, cattle, livestock), from Proto-Germanic *arbiją ‎(heritage), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃erbʰ- ‎(to change ownership) (from which also *h₃órbʰos ‎(orphan)). Cognate with Dutch erf ‎(inheritance, patrimony, ground, courtyard), German Erbe ‎(heritage, legacy, inheritance), Danish arv ‎(heritage, inheritance), Swedish arv ‎(heritage, inheritance), Gothic 𐌰𐍂𐌱𐌹 ‎(arbi, inheritance), Latin orbus ‎(orphan), Ancient Greek ὀρφανός ‎(orphanós, orphan), Old English ierfa ‎(heir). Related to orf.

NounEdit

erf ‎(plural erfs)

  1. (Northern England, Scotland, rare) Inheritance; patrimony.
    Son, you will have this farm to erf.
  2. (by extension) Stock; cattle.
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch erf ‎(patrimony, ground), related to English erf above.

NounEdit

erf ‎(plural erfs or erven)

  1. (US regional, Cape Colony, New York) A small inherited house-and-garden lot in a village or settlement.

Etymology 3Edit

Abbreviation.

NounEdit

erf

  1. (mathematics) error function

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

erf n ‎(plural erven, diminutive erfje n)

  1. yard

VerbEdit

erf

  1. first-person singular present indicative of erven
  2. imperative of erven
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