See also: Bach, bách, bạch, and bac̱h

English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Abbreviation of bachelor pad.[1]

Noun

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bach (plural baches)

  1. (New Zealand, northern) A holiday home, usually small and near the beach, often with only one or two rooms and of simple construction.
    Synonym: (New Zealand, in southern South Island) crib
Translations
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Verb

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bach (third-person singular simple present baches, present participle baching, simple past and past participle bached)

  1. (US) To live apart from women, as during the period when a divorce is in progress.

Etymology 2

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Noun

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bach (plural baches)

  1. (colloquial) Clipping of bachelorette.
    • 2018 April 30, Dani Pascarella, “Why You Feel Guilty When You Spend Money And How To Stop”, in Forbes[2], New York, N.Y.: Forbes Media, →ISSN, →OCLC, archived from the original on 2023-03-24:
      When I ask people how spending money makes them feel, so many of them respond, "Guilty." ¶ They'll give an example of how a rough day at the office led to buying a pair of shoes online or how they got a little carried away at their friend's bach party in Vegas.
    • 2020 August 14, Pippa Raga, “50 of the Best IG Captions for Your Bestie's Bachelorette or Hen Party”, in Distractify[3], archived from the original on 2023-02-02:
      Bachelorette party captions for Instagram [] Babes, baches, bikinis, and boats.
    • 2021 November 12, Erin Celletti, “Montreal Bachelorette Party Guide and Itinerary Ideas”, in Brides[4], archived from the original on 2023-05-31:
      While everyone else is flocking down South for a bach bash, you'll be singing "Oh, Canada," as you spend a weekend immersed in the city's uniquely hip take on old-world European culture.
    • 2023 May 19, Samantha Grindell, Hannah Chubb, “Only the 21 Best Bachelorette Party Destinations for You and Your "I Do" Crew, Bb”, in Cosmopolitan[5], New York, N.Y.: Hearst Communications, →ISSN, →OCLC, archived from the original on 2023-08-19:
      There are literally thousands of places you could go during a bach weekend in NYC, but take a tip from this New Yorker: Head to Beauty Bar as at least one of your bar-hopping spots.
    • 2023 May 25, Stephanie Cain, quoting Lauren Kay, “Why More Brides Are Opting for Solo Bachelorette Trips”, in The New York Times[6], New York, N.Y.: The New York Times Company, →ISSN, →OCLC, archived from the original on 2023-08-23:
      "Bach parties are a time-honored tradition, but just like weddings, these have become hugely personalized," Lauren Kay, the executive editor of The Knot, said. "Can you get married without one or by taking a solo trip? Absolutely."

References

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  1. ^ Siobhan Downes (2015 January 15) “New Zealand Beach Homes Get a Luxury Makeover”, in The New York Times[1], New York, N.Y.: The New York Times Company, →ISSN, →OCLC, archived from the original on 2019-04-14:Called a bach, an abbreviation of bachelor pad, the traditional version was a modest structure, often haphazardly pieced together of cheap materials like corrugated iron and reused timber.

Further reading

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Anagrams

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Polish

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Etymology

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Onomatopoeic.

Pronunciation

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Interjection

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bach

  1. boom, bam, pow, wham (used when imitating a sudden, hard hit)

Usage notes

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Derived terms

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verb

Further reading

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  • bach in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • bach in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Welsh

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle Welsh bych, from Proto-Brythonic *bɨx, from Proto-Celtic *biggos.

Adjective

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bach (feminine singular bach, plural bach, equative lleied, comparative llai, superlative lleiaf)

  1. small, little, short
    Na, rwy'n mynd ar y trên bach.[1]
    No, I'm taking the little train.
  2. not fully-grown or developed, young
  3. insignificant, unimportant, humble
  4. small (of business, etc.)
  5. lowercase (of letter)
Synonyms
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Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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From Middle Welsh and Old Welsh bach, from Proto-Celtic *bakkos, from Proto-Indo-European *bak-.

Noun

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bach m (plural bachau)

  1. hook
  2. hinge
    Synonym: colfach
  3. (typography) bracket
    Synonym: cromfach
Hyponyms
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Derived terms
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Compounds
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Mutation

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Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
bach fach mach unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading

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  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “bach”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

References

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