See also: Boom and Bööm

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: boo͞m
    • (UK) IPA(key): /buːm/
    • (US) IPA(key): /bum/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːm

Etymology 1Edit

Onomatopoeic, perhaps borrowed; compare German bummen, Dutch bommen (to hum, buzz).

VerbEdit

boom (third-person singular simple present booms, present participle booming, simple past and past participle boomed)

  1. To make a loud, hollow, resonant sound.
    Thunder boomed in the distance and lightning flashes lit up the horizon.
    The cannon boomed, recoiled, and spewed a heavy smoke cloud.
    Beneath the cliff, the sea was booming on the rocks.
    I can hear the organ slowly booming from the chapel.
    • 1902, Arthur Conan Doyle, The Hound of the Baskervilles:
      Did you ever hear a bittern booming?
  2. (transitive, figuratively, of speech) To exclaim with force, to shout, to thunder.
    • 1960, P[elham] G[renville] Wodehouse, “I and XVII”, in Jeeves in the Offing, London: Herbert Jenkins, OCLC 1227855:
      I was about to reach for the marmalade, when I heard the telephone tootling out in the hall and rose to attend to it. “Bertram Wooster's residence,” I said, having connected with the instrument. “Wooster in person at this end. Oh hullo,” I added, for the voice that boomed over the wire was that of Mrs Thomas Portarlington Travers of Brinkley Court, Market Snodsbury, near Droitwich – or, putting it another way, my good and deserving Aunt Dahlia.
      [...]
      “I'd give a tenner to have Aubrey Upjohn here at this moment.” “You can get him for nothing. He's in Uncle Tom's study.” Her face lit up. “He is?” [Aunt Dahlia] threw her head back and inflated the lungs. “UPJOHN!” she boomed, rather like someone calling the cattle home across the sands of Dee, and I issued a kindly word of warning. “Watch that blood pressure, old ancestor.”
  3. Of a Eurasian bittern, to make its deep, resonant territorial vocalisation.
    • 1887, H. Rider Haggard, She: A History of Adventure[1]:
      Miles on miles of quagmire, varied only by bright green strips of comparatively solid ground, and by deep and sullen pools fringed with tall rushes, in which the bitterns boomed and the frogs croaked incessantly[.]
  4. (transitive) To make something boom.
    Men in grey robes slowly boom the drums of death.
  5. (slang, US, obsolete) To publicly praise.
    • 1922, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Problem of Thor Bridge
      If you pull this off every paper in England and America will be booming you.
  6. To rush with violence and noise, as a ship under a press of sail, before a free wind.
    • 1841, Benjamin Totten, Naval Text-book and Dictionary []
      She comes booming down before it.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

boom (plural booms)

  1. A low-pitched, resonant sound, such as of an explosion.
    The boom of the surf.
  2. A rapid expansion or increase.
    You should prepare for the coming boom in the tech industry.
    • 1941 March, “Notes and News: The Demand for Slate”, in Railway Magazine, page 141:
      Some of the minor Welsh 2 ft. gauge railways, we hear from Mr. N. F. G. Dalston, are enjoying a miniature boom owing to the demand for slate for the repair of damaged roofs.
  3. One of the calls of certain monkeys or birds.
    • 1990, Mark A. Berkley, William C. Stebbins, Comparative Perception
      Interestingly, the blue monkey's boom and pyow calls are both long-distance signals (Brown, 1989), yet the two calls differ in respect to their susceptibility to habitat-induced degradation.
TranslationsEdit

InterjectionEdit

boom

  1. Used to suggest the sound of an explosion.
    crash boom bang
  2. Used to suggest something happening suddenly and unexpectedly.
    • 1993, Vibe (volume 1, number 2)
      So we went around the corner, looked in the garbage, and, boom, there's about 16 of the tapes he didn't like!
    • 2013, Peter Westoby, Gerard Dowling, Theory and Practice of Dialogical Community Development
      Hostile race relations and chronic unemployment are ignored in the suburbs of Paris, London and Sydney, and boom! there are riots.
  3. The sound of a bass drum beating.
  4. The sound of a cannon firing.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Dutch boom (tree; pole). Doublet of beam.

NounEdit

boom (plural booms)

  1. (nautical) A spar extending the foot of a sail; a spar rigged outboard from a ship's side to which boats are secured in harbour.
  2. A movable pole used to support a microphone or camera.
  3. (by extension) A microphone supported on such a pole.
  4. A horizontal member of a crane or derrick, used for lifting.
  5. (electronics) The longest element of a Yagi antenna, on which the other, smaller ones are transversally mounted.
  6. A floating barrier used to obstruct navigation, for military or other purposes; or used for the containment of an oil spill or to control the flow of logs from logging operations.
    • 1886, Peter Christen Asbjørnsen, H.L. Brækstad, transl., Folk and Fairy Tales, page 152:
      I went out on the timber boom and made a few casts, but with little success.
  7. A wishbone-shaped piece of windsurfing equipment.
  8. The section of the arm on a backhoe closest to the tractor.
  9. A gymnastics apparatus similar to a balance beam.
    • 1948, Josephine Tey, Miss Pym Disposes:
      The wooden upright was now standing in the middle of the floor, and the two booms were fitted into its grooved side and hoisted as high as hands could reach. [...] Two by two, one at each end, the students proceeded along the boom, hanging by their hands, monkey-wise. [...] Two by two the students somersaulted upwards on to the high boom, turned to a sitting position sideways, and then slowly stood up on the narrow ledge.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

boom (third-person singular simple present booms, present participle booming, simple past and past participle boomed)

  1. To extend, or push, with a boom or pole.
    to boom out a sail
    to boom off a boat
  2. (usually with "up" or "down") To raise or lower with a crane boom.

Etymology 3Edit

Perhaps a figurative development of Etymology 1, above.

NounEdit

boom (plural booms)

  1. (economics, business) A period of prosperity, growth, progress, or high market activity.
AntonymsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • German: Boom
  • Indonesian: bum
  • Japanese: ブーム (būmu)
  • Polish: boom
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

boom (third-person singular simple present booms, present participle booming, simple past and past participle boomed)

  1. (intransitive) To flourish, grow, or progress.
    Synonyms: flourish, prosper
    The population boomed in recent years.
    Business was booming.
    • 2021 March 22, Neil Vigdor; Michael Majchrowicz; Azi Paybarah, quoting Ron DeSantis, “Miami Beach, Overwhelmed by Spring Break, Extends Emergency Curfew”, in The New York Times[2], ISSN 0362-4331:
      “If you look at South Florida right now, this place is booming,” Mr. DeSantis said recently. “Los Angeles isn’t booming. New York City isn’t booming.”
  2. (transitive, dated) To cause to advance rapidly in price.
    to boom railroad or mining shares
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch boom, from Middle Dutch bôom, from Old Dutch bōm, boum, from Proto-Germanic *baumaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

boom (plural bome, diminutive boompie)

  1. tree

DutchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch bôom, from Old Dutch bōm, from Proto-West Germanic *baum, from Proto-Germanic *baumaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

boom m (plural bomen, diminutive boompje n)

  1. tree
  2. any solid, pole-shaped, usually wooden object
    1. beam
    2. mast
      Synonym: mast
    3. boom
      Synonym: giek
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Afrikaans: boom
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: bom
  • Jersey Dutch: bôm
  • Negerhollands: bom, boom
    • Virgin Islands Creole: bom (archaic)
  • Skepi Creole Dutch: bom, boom
  • English: boom
  • Indonesian: bom (tree, pole), bum
  • Sranan Tongo: bon

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English boom.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /buːm/
  • Hyphenation: boom

NounEdit

boom m (plural booms, diminutive boompje n)

  1. boom, as in a market explosion
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • M. J. Koenen & J. Endepols, Verklarend Handwoordenboek der Nederlandse Taal (tevens Vreemde-woordentolk), Groningen, Wolters-Noordhoff, 1969 (26th edition) [Dutch dictionary in Dutch]

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English boom.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

boom m (plural booms)

  1. boom (dramatically fast increase)

Derived termsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English boom, from Dutch boom - see above.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

boom m (invariable)

  1. a boom (sound)
  2. a boom, rapid expansion
  3. a boom (crane)

Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch bōm, from Proto-West Germanic *baum.

NounEdit

bôom m

  1. tree
  2. beam, pole
  3. boom barrier

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From English boom.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): //bum// invalid IPA characters (//)

NounEdit

boom m inan

  1. (economics, business) boom (period of prosperity)
  2. boom (rapid expansion or increase)

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • boom in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • boom in Polish dictionaries at PWN

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English boom.

NounEdit

boom m (plural booms)

  1. (economics, business) boom (period of prosperity)

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English boom.

NounEdit

boom n (plural boomuri)

  1. economic boom

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unadapted borrowing from English boom.

NounEdit

boom m (plural booms)

  1. boom (period of prosperity or high market activity)

See alsoEdit