English edit

 
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Etymology edit

From Middle English benefactor, borrowed from Medieval Latin benefactor (he who bestows a favor), from Latin benefaciō (benefit someone), from bene (good) + faciō (do, make).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

benefactor (plural benefactors, feminine benefactress or benefactoress or benefactrix)

  1. Somebody who gives a gift, often money to a charity.
  2. Someone who performs good or noble deeds.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

Catalan edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Late Latin benefactōrem.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

benefactor m (plural benefactors, feminine benefactora)

  1. benefactor

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Latin edit

Etymology edit

From benefaciō or benefactus +‎ -tor.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

benefactor m (genitive benefactōris); third declension

  1. (Late Latin) benefactor; one who confers a favour

Declension edit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative benefactor benefactōrēs
Genitive benefactōris benefactōrum
Dative benefactōrī benefactōribus
Accusative benefactōrem benefactōrēs
Ablative benefactōre benefactōribus
Vocative benefactor benefactōrēs

Antonyms edit

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Descendants edit

References edit

  • benefactor”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • benefactor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Late Latin benefactor, from Latin benefaciō. Compare the inherited doublet bienhechor.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /benefaɡˈtoɾ/ [be.ne.faɣ̞ˈt̪oɾ]
  • Rhymes: -oɾ
  • Syllabification: be‧ne‧fac‧tor

Noun edit

benefactor m (plural benefactores, feminine benefactora, feminine plural benefactoras)

  1. benefactor

Related terms edit

Further reading edit