benefactor

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English benefactor, borrowed from Medieval Latin benefactor (he who bestows a favor), from Latin benefaciō (benefit someone), from bene (good) + faciō (do, make).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

benefactor (plural benefactors, feminine benefactress or benefactoress or benefactrix)

  1. Somebody who gives a gift, often money to a charity.
  2. Someone who performs good or noble deeds.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


CatalanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin benefactor.

NounEdit

benefactor m (plural benefactors, feminine benefactora)

  1. benefactor

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From benefaciō or benefactus +‎ -tor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

benefactor m (genitive benefactōris); third declension

  1. (Late Latin) benefactor; one who confers a favour

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative benefactor benefactōrēs
Genitive benefactōris benefactōrum
Dative benefactōrī benefactōribus
Accusative benefactōrem benefactōrēs
Ablative benefactōre benefactōribus
Vocative benefactor benefactōrēs

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • benefactor”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • benefactor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin benefactor, from Latin benefacio. Compare the inherited doublet bienhechor.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /benefaɡˈtoɾ/, [be.ne.faɣ̞ˈt̪oɾ]
  • Hyphenation: be‧ne‧fac‧tor

NounEdit

benefactor m (plural benefactores, feminine benefactora, feminine plural benefactoras)

  1. benefactor

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit