Last modified on 17 November 2014, at 22:34

blanch

See also: Blanch

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French blanchir

VerbEdit

blanch (third-person singular simple present blanches, present participle blanching, simple past and past participle blanched)

  1. To grow or become white
    his cheek blanched with fear
    the rose blanches in the sun
  2. To take the color out of, and make white; to bleach
    to blanch linen
    age has blanched his hair
  3. (cooking) To cook by dipping briefly into boiling water, then directly into cold water.
  4. To whiten, as the surface of meat, by plunging into boiling water and afterwards into cold, so as to harden the surface and retain the juices
  5. To bleach by excluding the light, as the stalks or leaves of plants, by earthing them up or tying them together
  6. To make white by removing the skin of, as by scalding
    to blanch almonds
  7. To give a white luster to (silver, before stamping, in the process of coining)
  8. To cover (sheet iron) with a coating of tin.
  9. (figuratively) To whiten; to give a favorable appearance to; to whitewash; to palliate
    • Tillotson
      Blanch over the blackest and most absurd things.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Variant of blench

VerbEdit

blanch (third-person singular simple present blanches, present participle blanching, simple past and past participle blanched)

  1. To avoid, as from fear; to evade; to leave unnoticed.
    • Francis Bacon
      Ifs and ands to qualify the words of treason, whereby every man might express his malice and blanch his danger.
    • Reliq. Wot
      I suppose you will not blanch Paris in your way.
  2. To cause to turn aside or back.
    to blanch a deer
  3. To use evasion.
    • Francis Bacon
      Books will speak plain, when counsellors blanch.

LadinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin *blancus (compare Friulian blanc, Italian bianco, French blanc, Spanish blanco, Portuguese branco), from Proto-Germanic *blankaz (bright, shining, blinding, white), from Proto-Indo-European *bhleg- (to shine).

AdjectiveEdit

blanch

  1. white