See also: Silver

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English silver, selver, sulver, from Old English seolfor, seolofor (silver), from Proto-West Germanic *silubr, from Proto-Germanic *silubrą (silver), of uncertain origin.

Adjective sense of twenty-fifth wedding anniversary generalized from silver wedding, from German Silberhochzeit, silberne Hochzeit.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

silver (countable and uncountable, plural silvers)

Chemical element
Ag
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  1. (uncountable) A lustrous, white, metallic element, atomic number 47, atomic weight 107.87, symbol Ag.
  2. (collectively) Coins made from silver or any similar white metal.
    • 1990, David F. Friedman, ‎Don DeNevi, A Youth in Babylon: Confessions of a Trash-film King (page 136)
      [] maybe two or three twenties, a dozen tens, and twenty or thirty fins. The rest is all aces and silver.
  3. (collectively) Cutlery and other eating utensils, whether silver or made from some other white metal.
  4. (collectively) Any items made from silver or any other white metal.
  5. (uncountable) A shiny gray color.
    silver:  
  6. (countable) a silver medal
  7. Anything resembling silver; something shiny and white.
    • 1909 April 10, H[erbert] G[eorge] Wells, “[The Time Machine and Other Stories]. The Beautiful Suit.”, in The Short Stories of H. G. Wells, London: Ernest Benn Limited [], published September 1927, OCLC 492455359, pages 162–163:
      And next morning they found him dead, with his neck broken, in the bottom of the stone pit, with his beautiful clothes a little bloody, and foul and stained with the duckweed from the pond. But his face was a face of such happiness that, had you seen it, you would have understood indeed how that he had died happy, never knowing that cool and streaming silver for the duckweed in the pond.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Jamaican Creole: silva
  • Maori: hiriwa
  • Zulu: isiliva

TranslationsEdit

See silver/translations § Noun.

AdjectiveEdit

silver (comparative more silver, superlative most silver)

 
Silver Roman artwork
  1. Made from silver.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 10, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      He looked round the poor room, at the distempered walls, and the bad engravings in meretricious frames, the crinkly paper and wax flowers on the chiffonier; and he thought of a room like Father Bryan's, with panelling, with cut glass, with tulips in silver pots, such a room as he had hoped to have for his own.
    • 1959, Georgette Heyer, chapter 1, in The Unknown Ajax:
      But Richmond [] appeared to lose himself in his own reflections. Some pickled crab, which he had not touched, had been removed with a damson pie; and his sister saw, peeping around the massive silver epergne that almost obscured him from her view, that he had eaten no more than a spoonful of that either.
  2. Made from another white metal.
  3. Having a color like silver: a shiny gray.
  4. Denoting the twenty-fifth anniversary, especially of a wedding.
    • 1994, “Mate matching” in Accent on Living, v 38, n 4 (Spring), p 52:
      Mostly, these have been relationships of 10 or less years. However, one respondent has celebrated her silver wedding anniversary.
  5. (of commercial services) Premium, but inferior to gold.
  6. Having the clear, musical tone of silver; soft and clear in sound.
    a silver-voiced young girl

SynonymsEdit

  • (made from silver): silvern (archaic)
  • (having a color like silver): silvery

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See silver/translations § Adjective.

Derived termsEdit

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See alsoEdit

  • Appendix:Colors
  • VerbEdit

    silver (third-person singular simple present silvers, present participle silvering, simple past and past participle silvered)

    1. To acquire a silvery colour.
      • 1880 November 12, Lew[is] Wallace, chapter IV, in Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ, New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, [], OCLC 458843234, book sixth, page 416:
        Presently all the eastern sky began to silver and shine, and objects before invisible in the west—chiefly the tall towers on Mount Zion—emerged as from a shadowy depth, [...]
      • 1907 August, Robert W[illiam] Chambers, “Silverside”, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326, page 281:
        But when the moon rose and the breeze awakened, and the sedges stirred, and the cat's-paws raced across the moonlit ponds, and the far surf off Wonder Head intoned the hymn of the four winds, the trinity, earth and sky and water, became one thunderous symphony—a harmony of sound and colour silvered to a monochrome by the moon.
    2. To cover with silver, or with a silvery metal.
      to silver a pin;  to silver a glass mirror plate with an amalgam of tin and mercury
    3. To polish like silver; to impart a brightness to, like that of silver.
    4. To make hoary, or white, like silver.

    ReferencesEdit


    Further readingEdit

    • David Barthelmy (1997–2021), “Silver”, in Webmineral Mineralogy Database.
    • silver”, in Mindat.org[1], Hudson Institute of Mineralogy, 2000–2021.

    AnagramsEdit


    HunsrikEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From Middle High German silber, from Old High German silbar, from Proto-West Germanic *silubr.

    PronunciationEdit

    AdjectiveEdit

    silver

    1. silvern

    Further readingEdit


    Middle DutchEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From Old Dutch silver, from Proto-West Germanic *silubr.

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    silver n

    1. silver

    InflectionEdit

    This noun needs an inflection-table template.

    DescendantsEdit

    Further readingEdit


    Middle EnglishEdit

    Alternative formsEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From Old English seolfor, seolofor (silver).

    PronunciationEdit

    • IPA(key): /ˈsilvər/, /ˈsɛlvər/

    NounEdit

    silver (plural silvers)

    1. silver (metal)

    Related termsEdit

    DescendantsEdit


    Old SwedishEdit

    Alternative formsEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From Old Norse silfr, from Proto-Germanic *silubrą.

    NounEdit

    silver n

    1. silver

    DeclensionEdit

    DescendantsEdit


    SwedishEdit

     
    Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
    Wikipedia sv

    EtymologyEdit

    From Old Swedish silver, from Old Norse silfr, from Proto-Germanic *silubrą.

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    silver n (uncountable)

    1. silver
    2. silver, coins of silver
    3. silver, cutlery of silver
    4. a silver medal, for 2nd place in a competition

    DeclensionEdit

    Declension of silver 
    Singular Plural
    Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
    Nominative silver silvret silver silvren
    Genitive silvers silvrets silvers silvrens

    Derived termsEdit

    ReferencesEdit