See also: bliþe and Blithe

English edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English blithe (glad, happy, joyful; causing joy, joyous; gentle, mild; gracious, merciful; bright, shining; beautiful, fair) [and other forms],[1] from Old English blīþe (happy, gentle), from Proto-West Germanic *blīþī, from Proto-Germanic *blīþiz (friendly; gentle, mild; pleasing), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰlī- (fine; light; pleasant), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰel- (shiny; white).[2]

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

blithe (comparative blither, superlative blithest)

  1. Casually careless or indifferent; showing a lack of concern.
    She had a blithe disregard of cultures outside the United States.
  2. (chiefly Scotland, elsewhere dated or literary) Cheerful, happy.

Alternative forms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

References edit

  1. ^ blīthe, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  2. ^ Compare “blithe, adj., n., and adv.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 1887; “blithe, adj.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–2022.

Anagrams edit

Scots edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English blithe, from Old English blīþe, from Proto-West Germanic *blīþī, from Proto-Germanic *blīþiz. Cognate with Danish blid, Dutch blij, Icelandic blíður. Compare bliss.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

blithe (comparative blither, superlative blithest)

  1. Happy
    A howp ye haed a blithe birthday
    I hope you had a happy birthday