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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Perhaps from Middle English blot, blout (soft; flexible; pliable), from Old Norse blautr (soft)[1], akin to Danish blød, Dutch bloot (nude) and German bloß (nude)[2].

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

bloat (third-person singular simple present bloats, present participle bloating, simple past and past participle bloated)

  1. to cause to become distended.
  2. (intransitive) (veterinary medicine) to get an overdistended rumen, talking of a ruminant.
  3. to fill soft substance with gas, water, etc.; to cause to swell
  4. (intransitive) to become distended; to swell up
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Arbuthnot to this entry?)
  5. to fill with vanity or conceit
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
  6. to preserve by slightly salting and lightly smoking
    bloated herring

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

bloat (plural bloats)

  1. distention of the abdomen from death
  2. (veterinary medicine) pathological overdistention of rumen with gas in a ruminant
  3. (figuratively) wasteful use of space
    Adding an e-mail feature to this simple text editor would be pointless bloat.
  4. (derogatory, slang, dated) A worthless, dissipated fellow.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

bloat (comparative more bloat, superlative most bloat)

  1. (obsolete) bloated

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ bloat in Merriam-Webster's Dictionary
  2. ^ Cognates in ODS

AnagramsEdit