See also: blod, Blot, blót, blöt, blöd, bløt, blóð, and błot

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English blot (blot, spot, stain, blemish). Perhaps from Old Norse blettr (blot, stain), or from Old French bloche (clod of earth).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

blot (plural blots)

  1. A blemish, spot or stain made by a coloured substance.
    • 1595 December 9 (first known performance), William Shakespeare, “The life and death of King Richard the Second”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act II, scene i], page 28, column 2:
      England bound in with the triumphant ſea, / Whoſe rocky ſhore beates backe the enuious ſiedge / Of watery Neptune, is now bound in with ſhame, / With Inky blottes, and rotten Parchment bonds.
    • 1711, Jonathan Swift, An Excellent New Song
      I withdrew my subscription by help of a blot, / And so might discover or gain by the plot:
    • 1849 May – 1850 November, Charles Dickens, “Chapter XVII. Somebody Turns Up.”, in The Personal History of David Copperfield, London: Bradbury & Evans, [], published 1850, OCLC 558196156, page 176:
      Her utmost powers of expression (which were certainly not great in ink) were exhausted in the attempt to write what she felt on the subject of my journey. Four sides of incoherent and interjectional beginnings of sentences, that had no end, except blots, were inadequate to afford her any relief. But the blots were more expressive to me than the best composition; for they showed me that Peggotty had been crying all over the paper, and what could I have desired more?
    • 1918, Siegfried Sassoon, “The Death-Bed” in The Old Huntsman and Other Poems, London: Heinemann, p. 95,[1]
      [] He was blind; he could not see the stars
      Glinting among the wraiths of wandering cloud;
      Queer blots of colour, purple, scarlet, green,
      Flickered and faded in his drowning eyes.
  2. (by extension) A stain on someone's reputation or character; a disgrace.
    • 1595 December 9 (first known performance), William Shakespeare, “The life and death of King Richard the Second”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, scene iii], page 43, column 1:
      Thy ouerflow of good, conuerts to bad, / And thy abundant goodneſſe ſhall excuſe / This deadly blot, in thy digreſſing ſonne.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, [] (King James Version), London: [] Robert Barker, [], OCLC 964384981, Proverbs 9:7, column 2:
      He that reproueth a ſcorner, getteth to himſelfe ſhame: and he that rebuketh a wicked man, getteth himſelfe a blot.
    • 1785, William Cowper, “Book II. The Time-piece.”, in The Task, a Poem, [], London: [] J[oseph] Johnson; [], OCLC 228757725, page 46:
      Thus man devotes his brother, and deſtroys; / And worſe than all, and moſt to be deplored / As human nature’s broadeſt, fouleſt blot, / Chains him, and taſks him, and exacts his ſweat / With ſtripes, that mercy with a bleeding heart / Weeps when ſhe ſees inflicted on a beaſt.
    • 1960 February, “The dieselised St. Pancras suburban service”, in Trains Illustrated, page 95:
      The only blot on this service is that of its Kentish Town connections, which throughout the day in many cases just miss the St. Pancras-Luton stopping trains.
  3. (biochemistry) A method of transferring proteins, DNA or RNA, onto a carrier.
  4. (backgammon) An exposed piece in backgammon.

Derived termsEdit

Terms derived from blot (noun)

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

blot (third-person singular simple present blots, present participle blotting, simple past and past participle blotted)

  1. (transitive) to cause a blot (on something) by spilling a coloured substance.
  2. (intransitive) to soak up or absorb liquid.
    This paper blots easily.
  3. (transitive) To dry (writing, etc.) with blotting paper.
  4. (transitive) To spot, stain, or bespatter, as with ink.
    • 1566, George Gascoigne, Dan Bartholmew of Bath
      The briefe was writte and blotted all with gore, []
  5. (transitive) To impair; to damage; to mar; to soil.
  6. (transitive) To stain with infamy; to disgrace.
    • 1707, Nicholas Rowe, The Royal Convert
      Blot not thy Innocence with guiltleſs Blood.
  7. (transitive) To obliterate, as writing with ink; to cancel; to efface; generally with out.
    to blot out a word or a sentence
  8. (transitive) To obscure; to eclipse; to shadow.
    • 1656, Abraham Cowley, Davideis
      He ſung how Earth blots the Moons gilded Wane, []

Derived termsEdit

Terms derived from blot (verb)

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Middle Low German blōt (bare), from Proto-Germanic *blautaz (void, emaciated, soft), cognate with German bloß (bare) and Danish blød (soft).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

blot (plural and definite singular attributive blotte)

  1. (dated) mere, very

AdverbEdit

blot

  1. (slightly formal) only, merely
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed Old Norse blót, from Proto-Germanic *blōtą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

blot

  1. a sacrifice (especially a blood sacrifice by heathens)

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

blot

  1. imperative of blotte

Etymology 4Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

blot

  1. imperative of blote

Low GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German blōt (bare), from Proto-Germanic *blautaz (void, emaciated, soft), cognate with German bloß (bare) and Danish blød (soft). Spelling variant of bloot.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

  1. only, merely
SynoymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Der neue SASS: Plattdeutsches Wörterbuch, Plattdeutsch - Hochdeutsch, Hochdeutsch - Plattdeutsch. Plattdeutsche Rechtschreibung, sixth revised edition (2011, →ISBN, Wachholtz Verlag, Neumünster)

LuxembourgishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

blot

  1. neuter nominative of blo
  2. neuter accusative of blo

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *blōtą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

blōt n

  1. a sacrifice, especially a blood sacrifice by heathens
    He ealle ða cuman to blote gedydehe gave all the strangers as a sacrifice. (Alfred's Orosius)