bootleg

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

boot +‎ leg. Originally a nickname given to smugglers in King George III's reign, derived from the smugglers' custom of hiding packages of valuables in their large sea-boots when dodging the king's coastguardsmen.

VerbEdit

bootleg (third-person singular simple present bootlegs, present participle bootlegging, simple past and past participle bootlegged)

  1. (chiefly US, transitive) To make, transport and/or sell illegal alcoholic liquor.
  2. (transitive) To make, transport and/or sell an illegal version or copy of a copyrighted product.
  3. (intransitive) To engage in bootlegging.

Derived termsEdit

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NounEdit

bootleg (plural bootlegs)

  1. The part of a boot that is above the instep.
  2. An illegally produced, transported or sold product; contraband.
  3. (music) An unauthorized recording, e.g., of a live concert.
  4. (music) A remix or mashup that is a combination of two songs but that is not authorized and audited for copyright use; primarily in the electronic music scene.
  5. (American football) A play in which the quarterback fakes a handoff, conceals the ball against his hip, and rolls out.

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AdjectiveEdit

bootleg (not comparable)

  1. Illegally produced, transported or sold; pirated.

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See alsoEdit