borne

See also: Borne

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

borne (not comparable)

  1. carried, supported.
    • 1901 - Joseph Conrad, Falk: A Reminiscence
      In the last rays of the setting sun, you could pick out far away down the reach his beard borne high up on the white structure, foaming up stream to anchor for the night.
    • 1881: Oscar Wilde, "Rome Unvisited", Poems, page 44
      When, bright with purple and with gold,
      Come priest and holy cardinal,
      And borne above the heads of all
      The gentle Shepherd of the Fold.
    • c.2000 - David Irving v. Penguin Books and Deborah Lipstadt, II
      Irving is further required, as a matter of practice, to spell out what he contends are the specific defamatory meanings borne by those passages.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

borne

  1. past participle of bear
    • 1907, Harold Bindloss, The Dust of Conflict chapter 21 [1]
      “Can't you understand that love without confidence is a worthless thing—and that had you trusted me I would have borne any obloquy with you. []

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Late Latin bodina, butina, from Transalpine Gaulish.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

borne f (plural bornes)

  1. A bollard such as those used to restrict automobiles off a pedestrian area.
  2. A territorial boundary marker.
  3. A territorial or geographical border.
  4. A milestone such as those alongside a roadway.
  5. (slang) A kilometre.
  6. mark
    dépasser les bornes
    cross the mark

Derived termsEdit


JèrriaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin bodina, butina, from Gaulish.

NounEdit

borne f (plural bornes)

  1. boundary stone
Last modified on 31 March 2014, at 14:35