See also: brio- and brío

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian brio (finesse, talent), from Spanish brío, ultimately from Gaulish.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brio (uncountable)

  1. Vigour or vivacity.
    • 1917, Henry Handel Richardson, Australia Felix, Part II Chapter I
      He lay tossing restlessly on a dirty old straw palliasse, and was in great pain; but greeted his friend with a dash of the old brio.
    • 1986, John le Carré, A Perfect Spy:
      And as if to undermine their authority still further, Welsh Philpott in his innocence has made the error of placing Rick beside the pulpit in the very spot from which in the past he has read us the day's lesson with such brio and persuasion.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian brio.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brio m (uncountable)

  1. brilliance, panache
  2. (music) con brio

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish brío, ultimately from Gaulish.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brio m (plural brii)

  1. vivacity, liveliness

DescendantsEdit

  • English: brio
  • French: brio

AnagramsEdit


Old High GermanEdit

NounEdit

brīo m

  1. mash (as in mashed potatoes).

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish brío (vigour), from Old Occitan briu (wild), from Gaulish brīgos.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brio m (plural brios)

  1. mettle; courage
  2. zeal; vigour; vivacity
  3. pride; dignity

QuotationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:brio.