See also: Bruk and BRUK

Gothic edit

Romanization edit

bruk

  1. Romanization of 𐌱𐍂𐌿𐌺

Kalasha edit

Etymology edit

From Sanskrit वृक्क (vṛkka), from Proto-Indo-Iranian *wr̥tkás; compare Persianگرده(gorde).

Noun edit

bruk (Arabicبروُک⁩)

  1. kidney

Lithuanian edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

brùk

  1. second-person singular imperative of brukti

Lower Sorbian edit

Etymology edit

Cognate with Upper Sorbian bruk and Czech brouk.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bruk m animal (diminutive bruck)

  1. beetle (insect)

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • Muka, Arnošt (1921, 1928), “bruk”, in Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow (in German), St. Petersburg, Prague: ОРЯС РАН, ČAVU; Reprinted Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag, 2008
  • Starosta, Manfred (1999), “bruk”, in Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch (in German), Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Low German bruk.

Noun edit

bruk m or n (definite singular bruken or bruket, uncountable)

  1. use (noun)

Derived terms edit

Noun edit

bruk n (definite singular bruket, indefinite plural bruk, definite plural bruka or brukene)

  1. farm, works, mill, factory (industrial undertaking)

Derived terms edit

Verb edit

bruk

  1. imperative of bruke

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle Low German bruk.

Noun edit

bruk m or n (definite singular bruken or bruket, uncountable)

  1. use (noun)
Derived terms edit

Noun edit

bruk n (definite singular bruket, indefinite plural bruk, definite plural bruka)

  1. farm, works, mill, factory (industrial undertaking)
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

bruk

  1. imperative of bruka
  2. imperative of bruke

References edit

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology edit

Borrowed from German Brücke, from Middle High German brucke, from Old High German brugga, brucca, from Proto-West Germanic *bruggju, from Proto-Germanic *brugjǭ.[1] Doublet of bryka (britchka, car).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bruk m inan

  1. cobblestones (road pavement made of stones)
    • 1969, Seweryn Orzełowski, Budowa podwozi i nadwozi samochodowych[1], 18th edition, Wydawnictwa Szkolne i Pedagogiczne, page 379:
      Na podstawie obserwowanej eksploatacji wyznacza się [...] procentowe udziały pracy na drogach o różnych rodzajach nawierzchni (asfalt, bruk, drogi gruntowe)[...]
      On the basis of the observed exploitation one determines the percentage of action on roads with different kinds of pavement (asphalt, cobblestones, dirt roads) [...]
    • 2013 November 11, “Wyrwany bruk, rozbite samochody. Skutki zamieszek”, in Rzeczpospolita[2], archived from the original on 2023-01-11:
      Policja pilnuje zniszczonej ulicy Wilczej. Leży na niej bruk, szkło i metalowe słupki.
      The police is monitoring the ruined Wilcza [Wolf] Street. On it lie cobblestones, glass, and metal poles.
    • 2021 September 11, Aleksandra Beldowicz, “Poznań stawia na rośliny w centrum miasta”, in Rzeczpospolita[3], archived from the original on 2021-09-20:
      [...] władze miasta planują usuwać bruk i sadzić rośliny [...]
      [...] the city government plans to remove the cobblestones and plant plants [...]
  2. (archaic) pavement of any sort
    Synonym: nawierzchnia
    • 1934 June 13, “Zamach na asfalt magistracki”, in Józef Matuszczyk, editor, ABC: pismo codzienne informuje wszystkich o wszystkiem[4], number 161, Warszawa: Mazowiecka Spółka Wydawnicza, archived from the original on 2023-01-11, page 4:
      W tych dniach na ul. Gęsiej przystąpiono do naprawiania bruku asfaltowego, jednakże robotę chwilowo przerwano.
      In these days, on Gęsia [Goose] Street, the repair of the asphalt pavement was begun; however, the work was momentarily stopped.

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

adjective
adverbs
noun
verbs

References edit

  1. ^ Brückner, Aleksander (1927), “bruk”, in Słownik etymologiczny języka polskiego [Etymological Dictionary of the Polish Language] (in Polish), Warsaw: Wiedza Powszechna

Further reading edit

  • bruk in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • bruk in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish edit

 
Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

Etymology edit

From Low German bruk (use), from the verb bruken (to use).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bruk n

  1. (regular or continuous) use, usage
    Jag har inget bruk för den
    I have no use for it
    1. (in compounds) cultivation, tillage, etc. (use of soil, land, or other resources)
  2. a customary way of behaving within some group of people; a practice, a custom, a fashion, a tradition, culture
    seder och bruk
    customs and practices
  3. a mill, a works (industrial facility for processing raw materials, usually dealing with iron, wood, or glass – especially one with a long history)
    Han jobbar på bruket
    He works at the mill
  4. mortar (mixture of cement)
    • 1948, Ulf Peder Olrog, song title
      Mera bruk i baljan, boys
      More mortar in the trough, boys
    Synonym: murbruk

Usage notes edit

Idiomatic for using illegal drugs (and certain public services, e.g. home care) in (sense 1).

Declension edit

Declension of bruk 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bruk bruket bruk bruken
Genitive bruks brukets bruks brukens

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

See also edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

Tok Pisin edit

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Etymology edit

From English break.

Verb edit

bruk intrans., transitive brukim

  1. (intransitive) break

Adjective edit

bruk

  1. broken

Related terms edit