See also: usagé

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English usage, from Anglo-Norman and Old French usage.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈjuːsɪd͡ʒ/, /ˈjuːzɪd͡ʒ/
  • (file)

NounEdit

usage (countable and uncountable, plural usages)

  1. Habit, practice.
    1. A custom or established practice. [from 14th c.]
      • 1792, James Boswell, in Danziger & Brady (eds.), Boswell: The Great Biographer (Journals 1789–1795), Yale 1989, p. 170:
        [S]everal young people sung sacred music in the churchyard at night, which it seems is an usage here.
      • 1846, Charles Dickens, Dombey & Son:
        Mrs. Wickam, agreeably to the usage of some ladies in her condition, pursued [] the subject, without any compunction.
    2. (uncountable) Custom, tradition. [from 14th c.]
  2. Utilization.
    1. The act of using something; use, employment. [from 14th c.]
    2. The established custom of using language; the ways and contexts in which spoken and written words are used, especially by a certain group of people or in a certain region. [from 14th c.]
    3. (now archaic) Action towards someone; treatment, especially in negative sense. [from 16th c.]

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

ReferencesEdit

  • “usage” in R.R.K. Hartmann and Gregory James, Dictionary of Lexicography, Routledge, 1998.
  • Sydney I. Landau (2001), Dictionaries: The Art and Craft of Lexicography, 2nd ed., Cambridge University Press, p 217.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ūsus + -age. Compare Medieval Latin usagium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

usage m (plural usages)

  1. usage, use
  2. (lexicography) the ways and contexts in which spoken and written words are actually used, determined by a lexicographer's intuition or from corpus analysis (as opposed to correct or proper use of language, proclaimed by some authority)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

NounEdit

usage m (plural usages)

  1. habit; custom

Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

usage m (oblique plural usages, nominative singular usages, nominative plural usage)

  1. usage; use
  2. habit; custom