See also: Centaur

English edit

 
A bronze statue of a centaur

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin centaurus, from Ancient Greek κένταυρος (kéntauros), from Κένταυρος (Kéntauros, a member of a savage race from Thessaly).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

centaur (plural centaurs)

  1. (Greek mythology) A mythical beast having a horse's body with a man's head and torso in place of the head and neck of the horse.
    Synonym: hippocentaur
  2. (astronomy, also capitalised) An icy planetoid that orbits the Sun between Jupiter and Neptune.
  3. (chess) A chess-playing team comprising a human player and a computer who work together.
    • 2018, James Bridle, New Dark Age: Technology, Knowledge and the End of the Future, Verso Books, →ISBN, page 159:
      This was not Kasparov's approach. Instead of rejecting the machines, he returned the year after his defeat to Deep Blue with a different kind of chess, which he called ‘Advanced Chess’. Other names for Advanced Chess include ‘cyborg’ and ‘centaur’ chess.
  4. (by extension, artificial intelligence) A human and an AI who work together.
    • 2023 November 11, John Burn-Murdoch, “Generative AI and white-collar jobs: reasons to be wary”, in FT Weekend, The FT View, page 8:
      The first—termed “cyborgs” by the authors—intertwined with the AI, moulding, checking and refining its responses, while the second—“centaurs”—divided labour, handing off more AI-suited subtasks while focussing on their own areas of expertise.
    • 2023 November 13, James Somers, “A Coder Considers the Waning Days of the Craft”, in The New Yorker[1], →ISSN:
      Programming has not yet gone the way of chess. But the centaurs have arrived. GPT-4 on its own is, for the moment, a worse programmer than I am. Ben is much worse. But Ben plus GPT-4 is a dangerous thing.

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

See also edit

(mythical creature):

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Dutch edit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Ultimately from Latin centaurus, from Ancient Greek κένταυρος (kéntauros).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɛnˌtɑu̯ər/, /ˈkɛnˌtɑu̯ər/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: cen‧taur

Noun edit

centaur m (plural centauren, diminutive centaurtje n)

  1. centaur
    Synonyms: menspaard, paardmens

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl
 
centaur

Etymology edit

Learned borrowing from Latin centaurus.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

centaur m anim

  1. (Greek mythology) centaur (mythical half-man, half-horse)

Declension edit

Related terms edit

noun

Further reading edit

  • centaur in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • centaur in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin centaurus.

Noun edit

centaur m (plural centauri)

  1. centaur

Declension edit