EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

cess +‎ -er

NounEdit

cesser (plural cessers)

  1. (law) termination or cessation.
  2. (law) A neglect of a tenant to perform services, or make payment, for two years.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for cesser in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913)

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French cesser, from Old French cesser, borrowed from Latin cessāre, present active infinitive of cessō.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sɛ.se/, /se.se/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

cesser

  1. to cease; to stop
    • 1992, Nothomb, Amélie, Hygiène de l’assassin [The Assassin’s Hygiene] (fiction):
      Cessez de blasphémer, vile créature ! Apprenez, ignorante, que saint Prétextat était archevêque de Rouen au VIe siècle, et grand ami de Grégoire de Tours, qui était un homme très bien, dont vous n’avez naturellement jamais entendu parler.
      Stop blaspheming, you vile creature! You’d better learn, ignorant woman, that Saint Praetextatus was Archbishop of Rouen in the 6th century, and a friend of Gregory of Tours, who was a very good man, which you, unsurprisingly, never heard of.
  2. to break up (e.g. a relationship)

Usage notesEdit

  • In formal written French, cesser can be negated solely by the particle ne, without the need for pas.

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

cesser

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of cessō

Middle FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

cesser

  1. to cease; to stop

ConjugationEdit

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

ReferencesEdit

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (cesser, supplement)

Old FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

cesser

  1. to cease; to stop

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-ss, *-sss, *-sst are modified to s, s, st. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

ReferencesEdit

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (cesser, supplement)