EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From choke +‎ -er.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

choker (plural chokers)

 
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  1. A piece of jewelry or ornamental fabric, worn as a necklace or neckerchief, tight to the throat.
    • 1958, Anthony Burgess, The Enemy in the Blanket (The Malayan Trilogy), published 1972, page 292:
      Anne Talbot looked demurely ravishing, as was her intention, in a very low-cut evening frock of bottle-green, choker of Kelantan silver, earrings in the shape of krises.
    • 2010, Alice Fisher, The Observer, 24 Oct 2010:
      She appears on the 90th anniversary issue of French Vogue wearing nothing but a mask, gloves and a choker – everything but her now iconic gap-toothed pout and impressive cleavage is obscured.
  2. One who, or that which, chokes or strangles.
    • 1990, Janet Husband, Jonathan F. Husband, Sequels: An Annotated Guide to Novels in Series (page 199)
      The Yorkshire Choker, a serial killer who quotes Shakespeare, is pursued by Dalziel and Pascoe.
  3. One who operates the choke of an engine during ignition.
  4. (slang) Any disappointing or upsetting circumstance.
    I lost £100 on the horses today — what a choker!
  5. One who performs badly at an important part of a competition because they are nervous, especially when winning.
  6. A loop of cable fastened around a log to haul it.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English choke

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

choker

  1. (Quebec, transitive, intransitive) to choke
  2. (Quebec, figuratively, by extension) to stop, to inhibit, to prevent

ConjugationEdit