Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin

NounEdit

cicatrix ‎(plural cicatrixes or cicatrices)

  1. A scar that remains after the development of new tissue over a recovering wound or sore (also used figuratively).
    • 1938, Herbert Xavier, Capricornia, Chapter II, p. 21,
      He stopped to stare at two old men who sat beside the fire, naked and daubed with red and white ochre and adorned about arms and legs and breasts with elaborate systems of cicatrix.

TranslationsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unknown etymology.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cicātrīx f ‎(genitive cicātrīcis); third declension

  1. scar, bruise, incision

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative cicātrīx cicātrīcēs
genitive cicātrīcis cicātrīcum
dative cicātrīcī cicātrīcibus
accusative cicātrīcem cicātrīcēs
ablative cicātrīce cicātrīcibus
vocative cicātrīx cicātrīcēs

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • cicatrix in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cicatrix in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cicatrix” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • wounds (scars) on the breast: vulnera (cicatrices) adversa (opp. aversa)
    • to open an old wound: refricare vulnus, cicatricem obductam
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