EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Noun from Middle English wund, from Old English wund, from Proto-Germanic *wundō. Verb from Middle English wunden, from Old English wundian, from Proto-Germanic *wundōną.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wound (plural wounds)

  1. An injury, such as a cut, stab, or tear, to a (usually external) part of the body.
  2. (figuratively) A hurt to a person's feelings, reputation, prospects, etc.
    It took a long time to get over the wound of that insult.
  3. (criminal law) An injury to a person by which the skin is divided or its continuity broken.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

wound (third-person singular simple present wounds, present participle wounding, simple past and past participle wounded)

  1. (transitive) To hurt or injure (someone) by cutting, piercing, or tearing the skin.
    The police officer wounded the suspect during the fight that ensued.
  2. (transitive) To hurt (a person's feelings).
    The actor's pride was wounded when the leading role went to his rival.
Usage notesEdit
  • In older forms of English, when the pronoun thou was in active use, and verbs used -est for distinct second-person singular indicative forms, the verb wound had the form woundest, and had woundedst for its past tense.
  • Similarly, when the ending -eth was in active use for third-person singular present indicative forms, the form woundeth was used.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

See wind (Etymology 2)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

wound

  1. simple past tense and past participle of wind
    • 1905, Baroness Emmuska Orczy, chapter 1, in The Fate of the Artemis[1]:
      “[…] Captain Markam had been found lying half-insensible, gagged and bound, on the floor of the sitting-room, his hands and feet tightly pinioned, and a woollen comforter wound closely round his mouth and neck ; whilst Mrs. Markham's jewel-case, containing valuable jewellery and the secret plans of Port Arthur, had disappeared. […]”
Derived termsEdit