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See also: söre and -sore

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sor, from Old English sār (ache, wound, noun) and sār (painful, grievous, adjective), from Proto-Germanic *sairą (noun) (compare Dutch zeer (sore, ache), Danish sår (wound)), and *sairaz (sore, adjective) (compare German sehr (very)), from Proto-Indo-European *sh₂eyro-, enlargement of *sh₂ey- (to be fierce, afflict) (compare Hittite [script needed] (sāwar, anger), Welsh hoed (pain), Ancient Greek αἱμωδία (haimōdía, sensation of having teeth on edge)).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sore (comparative sorer, superlative sorest)

  1. Causing pain or discomfort; painfully sensitive.
    Her feet were sore from walking so far.
  2. Sensitive; tender; easily pained, grieved, or vexed; very susceptible of irritation.
    • Tillotson
      Malice and hatred are very fretting and vexatious, and apt to make our minds sore and uneasy.
  3. Dire; distressing.
    The school was in sore need of textbooks, theirs having been ruined in the flood.
  4. (informal) Feeling animosity towards someone; annoyed or angered.
    Joe was sore at Bob for beating him at checkers.
  5. (obsolete) Criminal; wrong; evil.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

sore (not comparable)

  1. (archaic) Very, excessively, extremely (of something bad).
    They were sore afraid.  The knight was sore wounded.
    • 1879, R[ichard] J[efferies], chapter II, in The Amateur Poacher, London: Smith, Elder, & Co., [], OCLC 752825175, page 071:
      Orion hit a rabbit once; but though sore wounded it got to the bury, and, struggling in, the arrow caught the side of the hole and was drawn out. Indeed, a nail filed sharp is not of much avail as an arrowhead; you must have it barbed, and that was a little beyond our skill. Ikey the blacksmith had forged us a spearhead after a sketch from a picture of a Greek warrior; and a rake-handle served as a shaft.
  2. Sorely.
    • 1919, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Jungle Tales of Tarzan
      [… they] were often sore pressed to follow the trail at all, and at best were so delayed that in the afternoon of the second day, they still had not overhauled the fugitive.

NounEdit

 
Sores

sore (plural sores)

  1. An injured, infected, inflamed or diseased patch of skin.
    They put ointment and a bandage on the sore.
  2. Grief; affliction; trouble; difficulty.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      I see plainly where his sore lies.
  3. A group of ducks on land. (See also: sord).
  4. A young hawk or falcon in its first year.
  5. A young buck in its fourth year.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

sore (third-person singular simple present sores, present participle soring, simple past and past participle sored)

  1. (transitive) To mutilate the legs or feet of (a horse) in order to induce a particular gait.

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin supra.

PrepositionEdit

sore

  1. over
  2. above

AdverbEdit

sore

  1. above
  2. on top
  3. up

Derived termsEdit


IndonesianEdit

NounEdit

sore

  1. afternoon (part of the day between noon and evening)

Istro-RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sōl, sōlem (compare Romanian soare); from Proto-Italic [Term?], from pre-Italic *sh₂wōl, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥. Compare Romanian soare.

NounEdit

sore m (definite singular sorele, plural sori)

  1. sun

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

sore

  1. Rōmaji transcription of それ

MalayEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Indonesian sore.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sore

  1. afternoon (part of the day between noon and evening)

SynonymsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French seür.

AdverbEdit

sore

  1. Alternative form of sure

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English sār, from Proto-Germanic *sairą (noun), *sairaz (adjective)

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Early ME, Northern ME) IPA(key): /sɑːr/
  • IPA(key): /sɔːr/

AdjectiveEdit

sore (comparative sorer, sorrer, superlative sorest)

  1. Senses associated with pain:
    1. Harmful; creating or producing pain.
    2. Sore, hurting, injured; currently in pain or wounded or affected by it.
    3. Capable of inducing or creating pain or wounds; rending or dire.
  2. Senses associated with anguish:
    1. Harmful; creating or producing anguish, sadness or torment.
    2. Upset, distressed; currently in agony or anguish or affected by it.
  3. Challenging, complicated, laborious; requiring a large expenditure of one's energies:
    1. Challenging to deal with on the battlefield; violent, intense, mighty.
    2. Challenging to deal with; inducing great anguish.
  4. (Used with words relating to pain, soreness, or anguish) Very, strongly, bad, grievously.
  5. Malicious, iniquitous, malign; not morally or spiritually in the right.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

NounEdit

sore (plural sores)

  1. The condition of bodily painfulness or hurting.
  2. A condition of anguish or affliction of the thought; injury of the mind:
    1. An issue or difficulty, especially one that causes great distress or evil.
    2. Regret; remorsefulness; anguish over one's past actions.
    3. (rare) The state of being scared or frightened.
  3. A specific affliction or condition:.
    1. A medical or pathological affliction or condition; a malady.
    2. A physical affliction or condition; a sore or wound.
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

AdverbEdit

sore (comparative sorer, sorrer, superlative sorest)

  1. Hurtfully, harmfully; in a way which creates wounds, painfulness, or anguish:
    1. Strictly, mercilessly, remorselessly; without attention to kindness or mercy.
    2. Expensively; in a way which creates a monetary or resource setback.
  2. With intense effort, prowess, or capability:
    1. Viciously, mightily, ruthlessly, strongly; using intense strength or prowess in battle.
    2. Nimbly, powerfully, quickly; using intense dexterity or physical force.
    3. Toilingly; backbreakingly, painstakingly; with much work.
    4. With great patience and focus; diligently; patiently.
  3. (Especially used with words relating to feelings or thought) Very, extremely, incredibly, a lot.
  4. Taut, secure; held strongly and with security.
  5. While suffering or experiencing an injury or pain.
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old French essorer.

VerbEdit

sore

  1. Alternative form of soren

Etymology 4Edit

From Old French sor.

NounEdit

sore

  1. Alternative form of sor

Etymology 5Edit

From Anglo-Norman soree.

NounEdit

sore

  1. Alternative form of sorre