EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sider, cidre, sidre, from Old French cisdre, sidre (beverage made from fermented apples), from Medieval Latin sīcera, from Ancient Greek σίκερα (síkera, fermented liquor, strong drink), from Hebrew שֵׁכָר(šēḵār, liquor). Doublet of cyser.

PronunciationEdit

 
American-style unfiltered, unfermented unpasturized cider (left); Apple juice (right).

NounEdit

cider (countable and uncountable, plural ciders)

  1. (Britain, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, Canada) An alcoholic, often sparkling (carbonated) beverage made from fermented apples; hard cider; apple cider
    • 1995, Paul Correnty, The Art of Cidermaking[1], Brewers Publications:
      The procedures for cyser are identical to cider with a notable exception: honey is a much more complex sugar than cane or corn sugars, meaning honey takes a long time to clear and an even longer time (at least six months) to ferment out []
  2. (US, Canada) A non-alcoholic still beverage consisting of the juice of early-harvest apples, usually unfiltered and still containing pulp; apple cider; sweet cider (without pulp such a beverage is called apple juice).
    She liked an aged cider. He liked a harder cider.
  3. (Australia) A non-alcoholic carbonated beverage made from apples.
  4. (Japan, South Korea) A non-alcoholic, lemon-lime flavored carbonated beverage.
  5. (countable) A cup, glass, or serving of any of these beverages.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Jersey Dutch: sâiter

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch sider, from Old French sidre, from Latin sicera.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cider m (plural ciders, diminutive cidertje n)

  1. cider.
    Synonyms: appelcider, appelwijn

Related termsEdit