FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin civis.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkiːʋis/, [ˈkiːʋis̠]
  • Rhymes: -iːʋis
  • Syllabification(key): kii‧vis

NounEdit

civis

  1. (university slang) A member of a student nation (osakunta) who is no longer a freshman (fuksi).

Usage notesEdit

  • Contrary to nearly all loanwords in Finnish, a borrowed nominative plural cives is sometimes used.

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of civis (Kotus type 39/vastaus, no gradation)
nominative civis civikset
genitive civiksen civisten
civiksien
partitive civistä civiksiä
illative civikseen civiksiin
singular plural
nominative civis civikset
accusative nom. civis civikset
gen. civiksen
genitive civiksen civisten
civiksien
partitive civistä civiksiä
inessive civiksessä civiksissä
elative civiksestä civiksistä
illative civikseen civiksiin
adessive civiksellä civiksillä
ablative civikseltä civiksiltä
allative civikselle civiksille
essive civiksenä civiksinä
translative civikseksi civiksiksi
instructive civiksin
abessive civiksettä civiksittä
comitative civiksineen
Possessive forms of civis (type vastaus)
possessor singular plural
1st person civikseni civiksemme
2nd person civiksesi civiksenne
3rd person civiksensä

Related termsEdit

  • beaani (first year student nation member, in some nations)

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *keiwis, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱey- (to settle, be lying down).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cīvis m or f (genitive cīvis); third declension

  1. citizen
    Civis romanus sum.
    I am a Roman citizen.
  2. (by extension) a subject (i.e., a person subject to a ruler)

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (i-stem, ablative singular in -e or occasionally ).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cīvis cīvēs
Genitive cīvis cīvium
Dative cīvī cīvibus
Accusative cīvem cīvēs
cīvīs
Ablative cīve
cīvī
cīvibus
Vocative cīvis cīvēs

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • civis”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • civis”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • civis in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • civis in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the aristocracy (as a party in politics): boni cives, optimi, optimates, also simply boni (opp. improbi); illi, qui optimatium causam agunt
    • a citizen of the world; cosmopolitan: mundanus, mundi civis et incola (Tusc. 5. 37)
    • a demagogue, agitator: plebis dux, vulgi turbator, civis turbulentus, civis rerum novarum cupidus
  • civis”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • civis”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

 

  • Hyphenation: ci‧vis

AdjectiveEdit

civis

  1. plural of civil

NounEdit

civis

  1. plural of civil