civitas

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Latin cīvitās ‎(city; state, city-state).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

civitas ‎(plural civitates)

  1. (pedantic) A community.
  2. (pedantic) A state, (chiefly) a city-state.

ReferencesEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From cīvis ‎(citizen) +‎ -itās.

PronunciationEdit

(Classical) IPA(key): /ˈki.wi.tas/, [ˈkɪ.wɪ.tas]

NounEdit

cīvitās f ‎(genitive cīvitātis); third declension

  1. citizenship: the status of belonging to and enjoying the rights of a city or larger state, especially (classical) Roman citizenship
  2. the rights of citizenship themselves, including freedom of the city
  3. the citizenry: a community, (by extension) the body politic, the state, particularly:
    1. (classical) the Celtic tribes or subkingdoms under Roman rule in Gaul and Britain
  4. the area of the citizens: a city with its associated hinterland or territory (thus distinguished from urbs), particularly:
    1. "The City", either (classical) Rome or (Medieval) Jerusalem
    2. (classical) the capital or center of Roman administration in each Celtic civitas (see above)
    3. (Medieval) a borough: a walled settlement, sometimes particularly former Roman towns
    4. (late Medieval) a city: a Biblical, major, or specially incorporated town, particularly cathedral cities
  5. (Medieval, Christianity) the community of believers: either the Church or Heaven

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative cīvitās cīvitātēs
genitive cīvitātis cīvitātum
dative cīvitātī cīvitātibus
accusative cīvitātem cīvitātēs
ablative cīvitāte cīvitātibus
vocative cīvitās cīvitātēs

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • civitas” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
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