EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French cloche (bell), from Medieval Latin clocca (bell).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /klɒʃ/, /kloʊʃ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒʃ, -oʊʃ

NounEdit

cloche (plural cloches)

  1. A glass covering, originally bell-shaped, for garden plants to prevent frost damage and promote early growth.
  2. A bell-shaped, close-fitting women’s hat with a deep rounded crown and narrow rim.
  3. A tableware cover, often resembling a bell.
  4. (aviation, historical) An apparatus used in controlling certain aeroplanes, consisting principally of a steering column mounted with a universal joint at the base, which is bell-shaped and has attached to it the cables for controlling the wing-warping devices, elevator planes, etc.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin clocca, from Proto-Celtic *klokkos (see also Welsh cloch, Old Irish cloc), ultimately imitative. Related to Old English clucge, Low German Klock (bell, clock), German Glocke, Swedish klocka.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cloche f (plural cloches)

  1. bell (metal apparatus used to produce sound)
  2. a glass covering, originally bell-shaped, for garden plants to prevent frost damage and promote early growth
  3. a bell-shaped, close-fitting women’s hat with a deep rounded crown and narrow rim
  4. a tableware cover, often resembling a bell.
  5. (colloquial) a clumsy person, an oaf

Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

cloche (plural cloches)

  1. (colloquial) clumsy, stupid

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

cloche

  1. first-person singular present indicative of clocher
  2. third-person singular present indicative of clocher
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of clocher
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of clocher
  5. second-person singular imperative of clocher

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From English clutch

NounEdit

cloche f (invariable)

  1. joystick
  2. gear lever (in a car)

Etymology 2Edit

From French cloche (bell)

NounEdit

cloche f (invariable)

  1. cloche hat

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

cloche

  1. Alternative form of cloke (claw)

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Medieval Latin clocca

NounEdit

cloche f (plural cloches)

  1. bell (metal apparatus used to produce sound)

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Medieval Latin clocca, probably from Celtic, compare Old Irish clocc, Welsh cloch, Manx clagg, all from Proto-Celtic *klokkos; ultimately imitative.

NounEdit

cloche f (oblique plural cloches, nominative singular cloche, nominative plural cloches)

  1. bell (metal apparatus used to produce sound)

SpanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English clutch.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈklot͡ʃe/, [ˈklo.t͡ʃe]

NounEdit

cloche m (plural cloches)

  1. clutch
    Synonym: embrague