AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French coffre.

NounEdit

cofre m (plural cofres)

  1. safe (box in which valuables can be locked for safekeeping)

SynonymsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French coffre, attested from the 13th century.[1]

NounEdit

cofre m (plural cofres)

  1. chest, coffer (large box often used for storage)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ “cofre” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French cofre, coffre, from Latin cophinus, from Ancient Greek κόφινος (kóphinos). Doublet of coffyn.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɔfər/, /ˈkɔfrə/, /ˈkɔːfər/

NounEdit

cofre (plural cofres)

  1. A coffer (box for valuables or money)
  2. A supply or store of money.
  3. A coffin; a box for burial.
  4. Any container or cavity.
  5. (rare) A place of secretion or hiding.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: coffer
  • Scots: coffer
  • Yola: koaver

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cophinus, from Ancient Greek κόφινος (kóphinos, basket).

NounEdit

cofre m (oblique plural cofres, nominative singular cofres, nominative plural cofre)

  1. chest (large box often used for storage)

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French coffre.

NounEdit

cofre m (plural cofres)

  1. safe (box in which valuables can be locked for safekeeping)

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French coffre. Cognate with English coffer. Doublet of cuévano.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkofɾe/, [ˈkof.ɾe]

NounEdit

cofre m (plural cofres)

  1. chest, coffer, trunk
    Synonyms: baúl, arca, arcón, arqueta
  2. safe
    Synonym: caja fuerte
  3. bonnet, hood (engine compartment of a car)

Usage notesEdit

The difference between baúl and cofre are twofold. In terms of use, cofres are used almost exclusively to safeguard objects of value kind of like a treasure chest, whereas baúles can be used in such a way but are typically used just to store objects a person has no immediate use for such as old clothes. In terms of appearance, a cofre has a convex or rounded cover and thus is not always entirely synonymous with English coffer. A baúl can have any kind of shape. Thus, a cofre is a type of baúl. In terms of English, more often than not, you could only translate trunk as baúl, but you could translate either baúl or cofre for chest. A baúl you might bring with you on a trip to transport your belongings, but you don't travel with a cofre unless you are a pirate who finds a cofre de tesoro (treasure chest) and brings it aboard your ship.

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit