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See also: störe and Störe

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English store, stoure, storre, from Anglo-Norman stor, estore, estorr, estoer, and Old French estour, estor, from Latin instaurare.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

store (plural stores)

  1. A place where items may be accumulated or routinely kept.
    This building used to be a store for old tires.
  2. A supply held in storage.
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses, II:13:
      But there was an infinite store of mercy in those eyes, for him too a word of pardon even though he had erred and sinned and wandered.
    • 1945 August 17, George Orwell, chapter 6, in Animal Farm: A Fairy Story, London: Secker & Warburg, OCLC 3655473:
      By late summer a sufficient store of stone had accumulated, and then the building began [] , under the superintendence of the pigs.
  3. (mainly North American) A place where items may be purchased.
    I need to get some milk from the grocery store.
    • 1899, Stephen Crane, chapter 1, in Twelve O'Clock:
      There was some laughter, and Roddle was left free to expand his ideas on the periodic visits of cowboys to the town. “Mason Rickets, he had ten big punkins a-sittin' in front of his store, an' them fellers from the Upside-down-F ranch shot 'em up […].”
    • 1948, Carey McWilliams, North from Mexico / The Spanish-Speaking People of The United States, J. B. Lippincott Company, page 75,
      In 1866 Colonel J. F. Meline noted that the rebozo had almost disappeared in Santa Fe and that hoop skirts, on sale in the stores, were being widely used.
  4. (computing, dated) Memory.
    The main store of 1000 36-bit words seemed large at the time.
  5. A large amount of information retained in one's memory.
    His vast store of jokes means he has something funny to say in every situation.
  6. A great quantity or number; abundance.
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, Sonnet 37:
      I make my love engrafted to this store.
    • 1645, John Milton, L'Allegro
      With store of Ladies, whose bright eies / Rain influence, and judge the prise / Of Wit, or Arms, while both contend / To win her Grace, whom all commend.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

store (third-person singular simple present stores, present participle storing, simple past and past participle stored)

  1. (transitive) To keep (something) while not in use, generally in a place meant for that purpose.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 1, in The China Governess[1]:
      The half-dozen pieces […] were painted white and carved with festoons of flowers, birds and cupids. To display them the walls had been tinted a vivid blue which had now faded, but the carpet, which had evidently been stored and recently relaid, retained its original turquoise.
    I'll store these books in the attic.
  2. (transitive, computing) To write (something) into memory or registers.
    This operation stores the result on the stack.
  3. (intransitive) To remain in good condition while stored.
    I don't think that kind of cheese will store well in the refrigerator.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

store

  1. definite of stor
  2. plural of stor

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

store

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of storen

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin storea.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

store m (plural stores)

  1. blind, shade (for a window)

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatvianEdit

NounEdit

store f (5th declension)

  1. sturgeon

DeclensionEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Anglo-Norman stor, estour, ultimately from Latin instaurare.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

store (uncountable)

  1. supplies, provisions
  2. livestock, farm animals
  3. (stored) possessions, savings
  4. collection, storage
  5. storehouse, storeroom
  6. value, importance
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English stōr and Old Norse stórr, from Proto-Germanic *stōraz; some forms are also influenced by Middle Dutch stuur.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /stoːr/, /stuːr/, /stɔːr/

AdjectiveEdit

store

  1. strong, powerful, intense
  2. violent, threatening, imposing
  3. stern, sharp, harsh
  4. numerous, large in number
  5. large, big, great
  6. coarse, rough
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

AdverbEdit

store

  1. violently, threateningly, imposingly
  2. sternly, sharply, harshly
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old English stōr; possibly from a Celtic language.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

store

  1. incense, frankincense, storax
ReferencesEdit

Norwegian BokmålEdit

AdjectiveEdit

store

  1. singular definite of stor
  2. plural of stor

Norwegian NynorskEdit

AdjectiveEdit

store

  1. singular definite of stor
  2. plural of stor

SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

store

  1. absolute definite natural masculine form of stor.