See also: Store, storĕ, störe, and Störe

English edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English store, stoure, storre, from Anglo-Norman stor, estore, estorr, estoer, and Old French estour, estor, from Latin īnstaurō.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

store (plural stores)

  1. A place where items may be accumulated or routinely kept.
    This building used to be a store for old tires.
    • 1936, Robert Frost, “The Vindictives”, in A Further Range:
      And his subjects wrung all they could wring
      Out of temple and palace and store.
  2. A supply held in storage.
    • 1922 February, James Joyce, “[13]”, in Ulysses, Paris: Shakespeare and Company, [], →OCLC:
      But there was an infinite store of mercy in those eyes, for him too a word of pardon even though he had erred and sinned and wandered.
    • 1945 August 17, George Orwell [pseudonym; Eric Arthur Blair], chapter 6, in Animal Farm [], London: Secker & Warburg, →OCLC:
      By late summer a sufficient store of stone had accumulated, and then the building began [] , under the superintendence of the pigs.
    • 2006, Carolly Erickson, The Last Wife of Henry VIII:
      What surprised us all was how Will's lighthearted nature and constant store of good humor won over one of the great heiresses of King Henry's court, Anne Bourchier.
  3. (mainly North American) A place where items may be purchased; a shop.
    I need to get some milk from the grocery store.
    • 1899, Stephen Crane, chapter 1, in Twelve O'Clock:
      There was some laughter, and Roddle was left free to expand his ideas on the periodic visits of cowboys to the town. “Mason Rickets, he had ten big punkins a-sittin' in front of his store, an' them fellers from the Upside-down-F ranch shot 'em up [] .”
    • 1948, Carey McWilliams, North from Mexico: The Spanish-Speaking People of The United States, J. B. Lippincott Company, page 75:
      In 1866 Colonel J. F. Meline noted that the rebozo had almost disappeared in Santa Fe and that hoop skirts, on sale in the stores, were being widely used.
  4. (computing, dated) Memory.
    The main store of 1000 36-bit words seemed large at the time.
  5. A great quantity or number; abundance.
  6. A head of store cattle (feeder cattle to be sold to others for finishing); a store cattle beast.

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Terms derived from store (noun)

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Tok Pisin: stua
    • Rotokas: sitoa
  • Afrikaans: stoor
  • Cantonese: 士多 (si6 do1)

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb edit

store (third-person singular simple present stores, present participle storing, simple past and past participle stored)

  1. (transitive) To keep (something) while not in use, generally in a place meant for that purpose.
    Coordinate terms: lay away, lay by, lay in, lay up, put aside, put away, put by, save, store away, store up
    I'll store these books in the attic.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 1, in The China Governess: A Mystery, London: Chatto & Windus, →OCLC:
      The half-dozen pieces [] were painted white and carved with festoons of flowers, birds and cupids. To display them the walls had been tinted a vivid blue which had now faded, but the carpet, which had evidently been stored and recently relaid, retained its original turquoise.
    • 2024 January 10, Chris Gilson, “RAIL's famous five...”, in RAIL, number 1000, page 27:
      Following allocation to Toton on January 1 1996, it stayed there until transferral to Crewe in November 2000, before being stored at Eastleigh on December 17 the same year.
  2. To contain.
    The cabinets store all the food the mice would like.
  3. Have the capacity and capability to contain.
    They sell boxes that store 24 mason jars.
  4. (transitive, computing) To write (something) into memory or registers.
    This operation stores the result on the stack.
  5. (transitive) To stock, to fill (a container, repository, etc.) with things.
    • 1911, James George Frazer, The Golden Bough, volume 8, page 244:
      I have eaten my fill, and had my pockets well stored.

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

Danish edit

Adjective edit

store

  1. definite of stor
  2. plural of stor

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

store

  1. (dated or formal) singular present subjunctive of storen

Anagrams edit

French edit

Etymology edit

From Latin storea (mat), via regional Italian stora (modern Italian stuoia).[1]

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

store m (plural stores)

  1. blind, shade (for a window)

Descendants edit

References edit

  1. ^ Etymology and history of “store”, in Trésor de la langue française informatisé [Digitized Treasury of the French Language], 2012.

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Latvian edit

Noun edit

store f (5th declension)

  1. sturgeon

Declension edit

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Anglo-Norman stor, estour, ultimately from Latin instaurare. Compare warnestore.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

store (uncountable)

  1. supplies, provisions
  2. livestock, farm animals
  3. (stored) possessions, savings
  4. collection, storage
  5. storehouse, storeroom
  6. value, importance
Descendants edit
References edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old English stōr and Old Norse stórr, from Proto-Germanic *stōraz; some forms are also influenced by Middle Dutch stuur.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /stoːr/, /stuːr/, /stɔːr/

Adjective edit

store

  1. strong, powerful, intense
  2. violent, threatening, imposing
  3. stern, sharp, harsh
  4. numerous, large in number
  5. large, big, great
  6. coarse, rough
Descendants edit
References edit

Adverb edit

store

  1. violently, threateningly, imposingly
  2. sternly, sharply, harshly
References edit

Etymology 3 edit

From Old English stōr; possibly from a Celtic language.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

store

  1. incense, frankincense, storax
References edit

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Adjective edit

store

  1. definite singular of stor
  2. plural of stor

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Adjective edit

store

  1. definite singular of stor
  2. plural of stor

Swedish edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

store

  1. definite natural masculine singular of stor

Anagrams edit