See also: Hood, -hood, and 'hood

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English hood, hod, from Old English hōd, from Proto-Germanic *hōdaz (cognate with Saterland Frisian Houd, West Frisian/Dutch hoed, German Low German Hood, German Hut). Cognate with Proto-Iranian *xawdaH (hat) (compare Avestan 𐬑𐬂𐬛𐬀(xåda), Old Persian 𐎧𐎢𐎭 (x-u-d /xaudā/)), from Proto-Indo-European *kadʰ- (to cover). More at hat.

NounEdit

hood (plural hoods)

  1. A covering for the head attached to a larger garment such as a jacket or cloak.
  2. A distinctively coloured fold of material, representing a university degree.
  3. An enclosure that protects something, especially from above.
  4. (automotive) A soft top of a convertible car or carriage.
  5. (US, automotive) The hinged cover over the engine of a motor vehicle: known as a bonnet in other countries.
  6. A metal covering that leads to a vent to suck away smoke or fumes.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

hood (third-person singular simple present hoods, present participle hooding, simple past and past participle hooded)

  1. To cover something with a hood.
    Antonym: unhood
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Clipping of hoodlum.

NounEdit

hood (plural hoods)

  1. (slang) gangster, thug.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Clipping of neighborhood; compare nabe.

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

hood (not comparable)

  1. Relating to inner-city everyday life, both positive and negative aspects; especially people’s attachment to and love for their neighborhoods.
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

hood (plural hoods)

  1. (slang) Neighborhood.
    • 1996, “Stakes is High”, in Stakes Is High, performed by De La Soul:
      Neighborhoods are now hoods cause nobody's neighbors / Just animals surviving with that animal behavior
    What’s goin’ down in the hood?
Usage notesEdit

Particularly used for poor US inner-city black neighborhoods. Also used more generally, as a casual neutral term for “neighborhood”, but marked by strong associations.

SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Clipping of hoodie, influenced by existing sense “hoodlum”.

NounEdit

hood (plural hoods)

  1. (Britain) person wearing a hoodie.

AnagramsEdit


ManxEdit

PronounEdit

hood (emphatic form hoods)

  1. (informal) second-person singular of hug
    to you

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English hōd, from Proto-Germanic *hōdaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hood (plural hoodes)

  1. hood (part of a garment):
    1. A hood as a symbol of rank (of the church and of guilds).
    2. A hood made of chain mail used as head armour.
  2. (rare, Late Middle English) Any sort of protective cloaking or covering.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: hood
  • Scots: hude, huid

ReferencesEdit


North FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian hâved.

NounEdit

hood n (plural hööd)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) (anatomy) head
    at hood sködle
    to shake one's head