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See also: Hood, -hood, and 'hood

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /hʊd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʊd

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English hood, hod, from Old English hōd, from Proto-Germanic *hōdaz (cognate with Saterland Frisian Houd, West Frisian/Dutch hoed, German Low German Hood, German Hut). Cognate with Sarmato-Scythian *xauda (hat) (compare Avestan 𐬀𐬛𐬂𐬑(xåda), Old Persian 𐎧𐎢𐎭 (xaudā)), from Proto-Indo-European *kadʰ- (to cover). More at hat.

NounEdit

hood (plural hoods)

  1. A covering for the head attached to a larger garment such as a jacket or cloak.
  2. A distinctively coloured fold of material, representing a university degree.
  3. An enclosure that protects something, especially from above.
  4. (automotive) A soft top of a convertible car or carriage.
  5. (US, automotive) The hinged cover over the engine of a motor vehicle: known as a bonnet in other countries.
  6. A metal covering that leads to a vent to suck away smoke or fumes.
SynonymsEdit
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

hood (third-person singular simple present hoods, present participle hooding, simple past and past participle hooded)

  1. To cover something with a hood.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Clipping of hoodlum.

NounEdit

hood (plural hoods)

  1. (slang) gangster, thug.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Clipping of neighborhood; compare nabe.

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

hood (not comparable)

  1. Relating to inner-city everyday life, both positive and negative aspects; especially people’s attachment to and love for their neighborhoods.
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

hood (plural hoods)

  1. (slang) neighborhood.
    What’s goin’ down in the hood?
Usage notesEdit

Particularly used for poor US inner-city black neighborhoods. Also used more generally, as a casual neutral term for “neighborhood”, but marked by strong associations.

SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Clipping of hoodie, influenced by existing sense “hoodlum”.

NounEdit

hood (plural hoods)

  1. (Britain) person wearing a hoodie.

AnagramsEdit


ManxEdit

PronounEdit

hood (emphatic form hoods)

  1. (informal) 2nd person singular of hug
    to you

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English hōd, from Proto-Germanic *hōdaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hood (plural hoodes)

  1. hood (part of a garment):
    1. A hood as a symbol of rank (of the church and of guilds).
    2. A hood made of chain mail used as head armour.
  2. (rare, Late Middle English) Any sort of protective cloaking or covering.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


North FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian hâved.

NounEdit

hood n (plural hööd)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) (anatomy) head
    at hood sködle
    to shake one's head