DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably from Latin eccu + sic. Compare Italian così, Istriot cussèi, Venetian cusì, Friulian cussì.

AdverbEdit

coisa

  1. so
  2. as, like
  3. like this/that

PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Portuguese cousa, inherited from Latin causa (cause, reason), in later and Vulgar Latin meaning "thing". Doublet of the borrowing causa. Compare French chose, Galician cousa, Spanish cosa, Italian cosa, Catalan cosa.

NounEdit

coisa f (plural coisas)

  1. thing (a physical object, entity or situation)
    Aconteceu uma coisa bastante estranha ontem à noite.A very strange thing happened last night.
    Comprei umas coisas com o salário desse mês.I bought some stuff with this month’s salary.
  2. thingamajig; gizmo, thingy (something whose name is unknown)
    Me alcance aquela coisa.Hand that thing over to me.
    Synonyms: troço (Brazil), treco (Brazil), negócio (Brazil), bagulho (Brazil), bagaça (Brazil), trem (Brazil), pira (Brazil), cena (Portugal), bang
QuotationsEdit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:coisa.

Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Kabuverdianu: kusa
  • Papiamentu: kousa

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

coisa

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of coisar
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of coisar