See also: causá, causà, and Causa

Asturian edit

Verb edit

causa

  1. inflection of causar:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Catalan edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Latin causa. Doublet of the inherited cosa. Cognates include English cause, French cause, Italian causa, Portuguese causa, Spanish causa.

Noun edit

causa f (plural causes)

  1. cause (the source of, the reason for)
  2. (law) lawsuit
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

causa

  1. inflection of causar:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading edit

Dalmatian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin causa.

Noun edit

causa f

  1. thing

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

causa

  1. third-person singular past historic of causer

Galician edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Latin causa. Doublet of the inherited cousa.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

causa f (plural causas)

  1. cause

References edit

  • causa” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2018.
  • causa” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • causa” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • causa” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

causa

  1. inflection of causar:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Interlingua edit

Noun edit

causa (plural causas)

  1. cause (someone or something that causes a result)

Related terms edit

Italian edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkaw.za/
  • Rhymes: -awza
  • Hyphenation: càu‧sa

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Latin causa. Doublet of the inherited cosa. Cognates include English and French cause, Portuguese and Spanish causa.

Noun edit

causa f (plural cause)

  1. cause
  2. (law) lawsuit
    Synonym: lite

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

causa

  1. inflection of causare:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

Latin edit

Alternative forms edit

  • caussa (used by Cicero and a little after him)

Etymology edit

From Old Latin caussa, from Proto-Italic *kaussā, further origin unknown. Connected by some to Latin cudo (I strike), in the sense "strike a cause," in which the Proto-Indo-European form would be *kewh₂-ud-ʰ-t-, from *kewh₂- (to cut, strike).[1][2] Others are skeptical of an Indo-European origin.[3] Related to Etruscan 𐌂𐌀𐌅𐌔𐌀 (cavsa).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

causa f (genitive causae); first declension

  1. cause, reason
    qua de causa/qua de re/quam ob causamfor this reason/therefore
    • 29 BCE – 19 BCE, Virgil, Aeneid 4.169-170:
      Ille diēs prīmus lētī prīmusque malōrum
      causa fuit [...].
      That day – a first of death, and onset of misery – it was the cause [of everything].
      (The union of Dido and Aeneas begets tragedy.)
  2. (law) case, claim, contention
  3. cause, judicial process, lawsuit
    Synonym: cognitiō
  4. motive, reason, pretext, inducement, motivation
  5. condition, occasion, situation, state
  6. (figuratively) justification, explanation
  7. (Medieval Latin) thing

Declension edit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative causa causae
Genitive causae causārum
Dative causae causīs
Accusative causam causās
Ablative causā causīs
Vocative causa causae

Derived terms edit

Postposition edit

causā (+ genitive)

  1. for the sake of, on account of
    urbis causāfor the sake of the city

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

References edit

  • causa”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • causa”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • causa in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • causa in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • on the spur of the moment: temporis causa
    • to make not the slightest effort; not to stir a finger: manum non vertere alicuius rei causa
    • my position is considerably improved; my prospects are brighter: res meae meliore loco, in meliore causa sunt
    • my circumstances have not altered: eadem est causa mea or in eadem causa sum
    • to quote as a reason; give as excuse: causam afferre
    • for valid reasons: iustis de causis
    • cogent, decisive reasons: magnae (graves) necessariae causae
    • on good grounds; reasonably: non sine causa
    • how came it that...: quid causae fuit cur...?
    • the motive, cause, is to be found in..: causa posita est in aliqua re
    • the motive, cause, is to be found in..: causa repetenda est ab aliqua re (not quaerenda)
    • I was induced by several considerations to..: multae causae me impulerunt ad aliquid or ut...
    • to interpose, put forward an argument, a reason: causam interponere or interserere
    • to find a suitable pretext: causam idoneam nancisci
    • under the pretext, pretence of..: per causam (with Gen.)
    • cause and effect: causae rerum et consecutiones
    • extraneous causes: causae extrinsecus allatae (opp. in ipsa re positae)
    • concatenation, interdependence of causes: rerum causae aliae ex aliis nexae
    • to leave the question open; to refuse to commit oneself: integrum (causam integram) sibi reservare
    • to be favourably disposed towards: alicuius causa velle or cupere
    • to speak of some one respectfully: honoris causa aliquem nominare or appellare
    • for one's own diversion; to satisfy a whim: voluptatis or animi causa (B. G. 5. 12)
    • in memory of..: memoriae causa, ad (not in) memoriam (Brut. 16. 62)
    • to cite a person or a thing as an example: aliquem (aliquid) exempli causa ponere, proferre, nominare, commemorare
    • a digression, episode: quod ornandi causa additum est
    • for political reasons: rei publicae causa (Sest. 47. 101)
    • to embrace the cause of..., be a partisan of..: alicuius partes (causam) or simply aliquem sequi
    • the aristocracy (as a party in politics): boni cives, optimi, optimates, also simply boni (opp. improbi); illi, qui optimatium causam agunt
    • to take up the cause of the people, democratic principles: causam popularem suscipere or defendere
    • to be a leading spirit of the popular cause: populi causam agere
    • to hold an inquiry into a matter: aliquid, causam cognoscere
    • without any examination: incognita causa (cf. sect. XV. 3, indicta causa)
    • a civil case: causa privata
    • a criminal case: causa publica (Brut. 48. 178)
    • to conduct a person's case (said of an agent, solicitor): causam alicuius agere (apud iudicem)
    • to address the court (of the advocate): causam dicere, orare (Brut. 12. 47)
    • to defend oneself before the judge (of the accused): causam dicere
    • to defend a person: causam dicere pro aliquo
    • to conduct some one's defence in a case: causam alicuius defendere
    • to have a good case: causam optimam habere (Lig. 4. 10)
    • to gain a weak case by clever pleading: causam inferiorem dicendo reddere superiorem (λόγον κρείττω ποιειν) (Brut. 8. 30)
    • counsel; advocate: patronus (causae) (De Or. 2. 69)
    • to undertake a case: causam suscipere
    • to undertake a case: ad causam aggredi or accedere
    • without going to law: indicta causa (opp. cognita causa)
    • to win a case: causam or litem obtinere
    • to lose one's case: causam or litem amittere, perdere
    • to decide on the conduct of the case: iudicare causam (de aliqua re)
  • Dizionario Latino, Olivetti
  1. ^ Roberts, Edward A. (2014) A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the Spanish Language with Families of Words based on Indo-European Roots, Xlibris Corporation, →ISBN
  2. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “100-01”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page causa
  3. ^ EM. 108

Occitan edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Latin causa.

Noun edit

causa f (plural causas)

  1. cause
    Synonym: encausa
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Occitan [Term?], inherited from Latin causa (in these dialects/varieties). Cf. also encausa (cause).

Noun edit

causa f (plural causas)

  1. (Gascony, Languedoc) thing
Alternative forms edit

Further reading edit

Portuguese edit

Pronunciation edit

 
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈkaw.zɐ/ [ˈkaʊ̯.zɐ]
    • (Southern Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈkaw.za/ [ˈkaʊ̯.za]

  • Rhymes: -awzɐ
  • Hyphenation: cau‧sa

Etymology 1 edit

Learned borrowing from Latin causa. Doublet of the inherited coisa and cousa. Cognates include English and French cause, Italian and Spanish causa.

Noun edit

causa f (plural causas)

  1. cause, reason
  2. (law) suit, lawsuit
  3. goal, aim

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

causa

  1. inflection of causar:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Spanish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkausa/ [ˈkau̯.sa]
  • Rhymes: -ausa
  • Syllabification: cau‧sa

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Latin causa. Doublet of the inherited cosa. Cognates include English cause, French cause, Italian causa, Portuguese causa.

Noun edit

causa f (plural causas)

  1. cause
  2. (law) lawsuit
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from Quechua kawsay (life), influenced by the term above.

Noun edit

causa f (plural causas)

  1. a dish in Peruvian cuisine made with potatoes and layered or topped with meat or vegetables
    Synonyms: causa a la limeña, causa limeña
  2. (colloquial, Peru, slang) dude, mate, bro
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:tío

Etymology 3 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

causa

  1. inflection of causar:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading edit