concatenate

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the perfect passive participle stem of Latin concatēnāre (to link or chain together), from con (with) + catēnō (chain, bind), from catēna (a chain).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kənˈkætəneɪt/

VerbEdit

concatenate (third-person singular simple present concatenates, present participle concatenating, simple past and past participle concatenated)

  1. To join or link together, as though in a chain.
    • 2003, Roy Porter, Flesh in the Age of Reason, (Penguin 2004), page 182)
      Locke, by contrast, contended that [madness] was essentially a question of intellectual delusion, the capture of the mind by false ideas concatenated into a logical system of unreality.
  2. Computer instruction to join two strings together.
    Concatenating "Man" with " is mortal" gives "Man is mortal"
    The Unix program cat is used to concatenate and display files. Its name comes from the word catenate.

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

concatenate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of concatenare
  2. second-person plural imperative of concatenare
  3. feminine plural of concatenato
Last modified on 7 April 2014, at 15:07