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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin, from Latin catēna (chain) (from which also chain).

NounEdit

catena (plural catenas or catenae)

  1. A series of related items.
    • 1873, Walter Bagehot, Lombard Street:
      And, on the contrary, there is a whole catena of authorities, beginning with Sir Robert Peel and ending with Mr. Lowe, which say that the Banking Department of the Bank of England is only a Bank like any other bank [...]
  2. (soil science) A series of distinct soils arrayed along a slope.
    • 2000, Ewan Anderson, Middle East: Geography and Geopolitics, Routledge, →ISBN, page 55:
      The changes in soil characteristics from the crest to the foot of a slope are together known as a catena.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

catena (plural catenas)

  1. chain

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin catēna.

NounEdit

catena f (plural catene)

  1. chain
  2. bond, fetter; subordination, repression
  3. tie, cord, bond
  4. tether (a rope, cable etc. that holds something in place whilst allowing some movement)

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

The origin is uncertain. Probably connected with cassis (hunting-net).[1]

Pokorny derives catēna and cassis from Proto-Indo-European *kat- (to link or weave together; chain, net), with casa as another possible cognate.[2]

Martirosyan connects cassis and catēna with Old Armenian ցանց (cʿancʿ, casting-net) and derives all from a Mediterranean substrate.[3]

PronunciationEdit

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /kaˈteː.na/
  • (file)

NounEdit

catēna f (genitive catēnae); first declension

  1. chain

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative catēna catēnae
Genitive catēnae catēnārum
Dative catēnae catēnīs
Accusative catēnam catēnās
Ablative catēnā catēnīs
Vocative catēna catēnae

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, pages 97, 98
  2. ^ Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), volume II, Bern, München: Francke Verlag, page 534
  3. ^ Martirosyan, Hrach (2016), “Mediterranean substrate words in Armenian: two etymologies”, in Bjarne Simmelkjær Sandgaard Hansen, Benedicte Nielsen Whitehead, Thomas Olander & Birgit Anette Olsen, editors, Etymology and the European Lexicon. Proceedings of the 14th Fachtagung of the Indogermanische Gesellschaft, Copenhagen, 17-22 September 2012[1], Wiesbaden: Reichert Verlag, page 294

Further readingEdit

  • catena in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • catena in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • catena in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • catena in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to put some one in irons, chains: in vincula, in catenas conicere aliquem
  • catena in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • catena in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin