conception

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English concepcioun, borrowed from Old French conception, from Latin conceptiō (a comprehending, a collection, composition, an expression, also a becoming pregnant), from concipiō, past participle conceptus (conceive); see conceive.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kənˈsɛpʃən/
  • (file)

NounEdit

conception (countable and uncountable, plural conceptions)

  1. The act of conceiving.
  2. The state of being conceived; the beginning.
  3. The fertilization of an ovum by a sperm to form a zygote.
  4. The start of pregnancy.
  5. The formation of a conceptus or an implanted embryo.
  6. The power or faculty of apprehending of forming an idea in the mind; the power of recalling a past sensation or perception; the ability to form mental abstractions.
  7. An image, idea, or notion formed in the mind; a concept, plan or design.
    • 1962 October, Brian Haresnape, “Focus on B.R. passenger stations”, in Modern Railways, pages 250-251:
      Elegant brick and stone buildings, with iron and glass canopies and decorative wooden scalloping and fencing—all evidencing care on the part of the architect to produce a pleasing, well-planned building—were submerged beneath a profusion of ill-conceived additions and camouflaged by vulgar paint schemes; and the original conception was lost.

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French conception, concepcion, borrowed from Latin conceptio, conceptionem (comprehension, understanding).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

conception f (plural conceptions)

  1. conception (of a child)
  2. conception (beginning, start)
  3. ability to understand
  4. viewpoint; angle
  5. concept, idea

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Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin conceptio, conceptionem (comprehension, understanding).

NounEdit

conception f (oblique plural conceptions, nominative singular conception, nominative plural conceptions)

  1. conception (of a child)
    • 1377, Bernard de Gordon, Fleur de lis de medecine (a.k.a. lilium medicine):
      Et sont retenus naturellement comme en concepcion
      And they [menses] are naturally retained in the case of conception

DescendantsEdit