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ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin concordia.

NounEdit

concordia f (plural concordie)

  1. concord

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From concors (agreeing, of one mind).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

concordia f (genitive concordiae); first declension

  1. an agreement together, union, harmony, concord
  2. (poetic) an intimate friend

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative concordia concordiae
Genitive concordiae concordiārum
Dative concordiae concordiīs
Accusative concordiam concordiās
Ablative concordiā concordiīs
Vocative concordia concordiae

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: concord
  • French: concorde
  • Italian: concordia
  • Spanish: concordia

ReferencesEdit

  • concordia in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • concordia in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • concordia in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • concordia in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • concordia in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • concordia in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  • concordia in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly
  • concordia in Richard Stillwell et al., editor (1976) The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites, Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin concordia.

NounEdit

concordia f (plural concordias)

  1. concord
  2. ring consisting of two interlaced parts