See also: Ring and riñg

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English ring, ryng, also rink, rynk, from Old English hring, hrincg ‎(ring, link of chain, fetter, festoon, anything circular, circle, circular group, border, horizon, corselet, circuit (of a year), cycle, course, orb, globe), from Proto-Germanic *hringaz ‎(circle), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)krengʰ- ‎(to turn, bend). Akin to Scots ring ‎(ring), West Frisian ring ‎(ring), Saterland Frisian Ring ‎(ring, circle), Dutch ring ‎(ring, hoop), Low German Ring ‎(ring), German Ring ‎(ring, circle), Swedish ring ‎(ring, circle), Icelandic hringur ‎(ring), Umbrian krenkatrum, cringatro ‎(belt), Proto-Slavic *krǫgъ ‎(circle) (Russian круг ‎(krug)), Old English hrung ‎(cross-bar, spoke), Albanian vrangull ‎(a wheel-shaped tool, circle motion), rreng ‎(to do a prank, cheat, deceive). More at rung.

NounEdit

ring ‎(plural rings)

  1. (physical) A solid object in the shape of a circle.
    1. A circumscribing object, (roughly) circular and hollow, looking like an annual ring, earring, finger ring etc.
    2. A round piece of (precious) metal worn around the finger or through the ear, nose, etc.
    3. (Britain) A bird band, a round piece of metal put around a bird's leg used for identification and studies of migration.
    4. (Britain) A burner on a kitchen stove.
    5. In a jack plug, the connector between the tip and the sleeve.
    6. An instrument, formerly used for taking the sun's altitude, consisting of a brass ring suspended by a swivel, with a hole at one side through which a solar ray entering indicated the altitude on the graduated inner surface opposite.
    7. (botany) A flexible band partly or wholly encircling the spore cases of ferns.
  2. (physical) A group of objects arranged in a circle.
    1. A circular group of people or objects.
      a ring of mushrooms growing in the wood
      • John Milton (1608-1674)
        And hears the Muses in a ring / Aye round about Jove's altar sing.
      • 1944, Miles Burton, chapter 5, in The Three Corpse Trick:
        The hovel stood in the centre of what had once been a vegetable garden, but was now a patch of rank weeds. Surrounding this, almost like a zareba, was an irregular ring of gorse and brambles, an unclaimed vestige of the original common.
    2. (astronomy) A formation of various pieces of material orbiting around a planet.
    3. (Britain) A large circular prehistoric stone construction such as Stonehenge.
  3. A piece of food in the shape of a ring.
    onion rings
  4. A place where some sports or exhibitions take place; notably a circular or comparable arena, such as a boxing ring or a circus ring; hence the field of a political contest.
    • Edmund Smith (1672–1710)
      Place me, O, place me in the dusty ring, / Where youthful charioteers contend for glory.
  5. An exclusive group of people, usually involving some unethical or illegal practices.
    a crime ring; a prostitution ring; a bidding ring (at an auction sale)
    • Edward Augustus Freeman (1823-1892)
      the ruling ring at Constantinople
    • 1928, Upton Sinclair, Boston
      It's a blackmail ring, and the district attorneys get a share of the loot.
  6. (chemistry) A group of atoms linked by bonds to form a closed chain in a molecule.
    a benzene ring
  7. (geometry) A planar geometrical figure included between two concentric circles.
  8. (typography) A diacritical mark in the shape of a hollow circle placed above or under the letter; a kroužek.
  9. (historical) An old English measure of corn equal to the coomb or half a quarter.
    • 1866, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, Volume 1, page 168.
      The ring is common in the Huntingdonshire accounts of Ramsey Abbey. It was equal to half a quarter, i.e., is identical with the coomb of the eastern counties. —
  10. (computing theory) A hierarchical level of privilege in a computer system, usually at hardware level, used to protect data and functionality (also protection ring).
    • 2007, Steve Anson, Steve Bunting, Mastering Windows Network Forensics and Investigation (page 70)
      Kernel Mode processes run in ring 0, and User Mode processes run in ring 3.
  11. (firearms) Either of the pair of clamps used to hold a telescopic sight to a rifle.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

ring ‎(third-person singular simple present rings, present participle ringing, simple past and past participle ringed)

  1. (transitive) To surround or enclose.
    The inner city was ringed with dingy industrial areas.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To make an incision around; to girdle.
    They ringed the trees to make the clearing easier next year.
  3. (transitive) To attach a ring to, especially for identification.
    Only ringed hogs may forage in the commons.
    We managed to ring 22 birds this morning.
  4. (transitive) To surround or fit with a ring, or as if with a ring.
    to ring a pig's snout
    • Shakespeare
      Ring these fingers.
  5. (falconry) To rise in the air spirally.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English ringen, from Old English hringan ‎(to ring, sound, clash; announce by bells), from Proto-Germanic *hringijaną ‎(to resound, ring), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kreg- ‎(to crow, caw, croak, shout). Cognate with Dutch ringen ‎(to ring), Danish ringe ‎(to ring, call), Swedish ringa ‎(to ring, call), Icelandic hringja ‎(to ring, call), Lithuanian krañkti ‎(to caw, croak, cough), Albanian vring ‎(a high-pitched sound made by waving violently a solid object).

NounEdit

ring ‎(plural rings)

  1. The resonant sound of a bell, or a sound resembling it.
    The church bell's ring could be heard the length of the valley.
    The ring of hammer on anvil filled the air.
  2. (figuratively) A pleasant or correct sound.
    The name has a nice ring to it.
  3. (figuratively) A sound or appearance that is characteristic of something.
    Her statements in court had a ring of falsehood.
  4. (colloquial) A telephone call.
    I’ll give you a ring when the plane lands.
  5. Any loud sound; the sound of numerous voices; a sound continued, repeated, or reverberated.
    • Francis Bacon
      the ring of acclamations fresh in his ears
  6. A chime, or set of bells harmonically tuned.
    St Mary's has a ring of eight bells.
    • Fuller
      as great and tunable a ring of bells as any in the world
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

ring ‎(third-person singular simple present rings, present participle ringing, simple past rang or (nonstandard) rung, past participle rung)

  1. (intransitive) Of a bell, to produce sound.
    The bells were ringing in the town.
  2. (transitive) To make (a bell) produce sound.
    The deliveryman rang the doorbell to drop off a parcel.
    • Shakespeare
      The shard-borne beetle, with his drowsy hums, / Hath rung night's yawning peal.
  3. (intransitive, figuratively) To produce the sound of a bell or a similar sound.
    Whose mobile phone is ringing?
  4. (intransitive, figuratively) Of something spoken or written, to appear to be, to seem, to sound.
    That does not ring true.
  5. (transitive, colloquial, Britain, New Zealand) To telephone (someone).
    I will ring you when we arrive.
  6. (intransitive) to resound, reverberate, echo.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      So he spoke, and it seemed there was a little halting at first, as of men not liking to take Blackbeard's name in Blackbeard's place, or raise the Devil by mocking at him. But then some of the bolder shouted 'Blackbeard', and so the more timid chimed in, and in a minute there were a score of voices calling 'Blackbeard, Blackbeard', till the place rang again.
    • 1919, Boris Sidis, The Source and Aim of Human Progress:
      It is instructive for us to learn as well as to ponder on the fact that "the very men who looked down with delight, when the sand of the arena reddened with human blood, made the arena ring with applause when Terence in his famous line: ‘Homo sum, Nihil humani alienum puto’ proclaimed the brotherhood of man."
  7. (intransitive) To produce music with bells.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holder to this entry?)
  8. (dated) To repeat often, loudly, or earnestly.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 3Edit

A shortening of German Zahlring ‎(number(s) ring); coined by mathematician David Hilbert in 1892. (Reference: Harvey Cohn, Advanced Number Theory, page 49.)

NounEdit

ring ‎(plural rings)

  1. (algebra) An algebraic structure which consists of a set with two binary operations: an additive operation and a multiplicative operation, such that the set is an abelian group under the additive operation, a monoid under the multiplicative operation, and such that the multiplicative operation is distributive with respect to the additive operation.
    The set of integers, , is the prototypical ring.
  2. (algebra) An algebraic structure as above, but only required to be a semigroup under the multiplicative operation, that is, there need not be a multiplicative identity element.
    The definition of ring without unity allows, for instance, the set of even integers to be a ring.
HypernymsEdit
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


BalineseEdit

PrepositionEdit

ring

  1. in, at

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ring m inan

  1. ring (place where some sports take place; boxing ring and similar)

DeclensionEdit

External linksEdit

  • ring in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • ring in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse hringr, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /renɡ/, [ʁæŋˀ]

NounEdit

ring c (singular definite ringen, plural indefinite ringe)

  1. ring
  2. circle
  3. halo
  4. hoop
  5. coil
InflectionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Verbal noun to ringe ‎(to ring).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /renɡ/, [ʁæŋˀ]

NounEdit

ring n (singular definite ringet, plural indefinite ring)

  1. (archaic) ring (the resonant sound of a bell, a telephone call)
InflectionEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See ringe.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /renɡ/, [ʁæŋˀ]

VerbEdit

ring

  1. imperative of ringe

DutchEdit

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch ring, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

NounEdit

ring m ‎(plural ringen, diminutive ringetje n)

  1. ring, hollow circular object
  2. beltway

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


EstonianEdit

NounEdit

ring ‎(genitive [please provide], partitive [please provide])

  1. circle

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English (sense 1) and Dutch (sense 2).

NounEdit

ring m ‎(plural rings)

  1. (sports, chiefly combat sports) ring
  2. (Belgium) ring road, beltway

External linksEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ring

  1. Imperative singular of ringen.
  2. (colloquial) First-person singular present of ringen.

HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈriŋɡ]
  • Hyphenation: ring

Etymology 1Edit

From a sound-imitative root +‎ -g ‎(frequentative suffix). [1]

VerbEdit

ring

  1. (intransitive) to sway
ConjugationEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From English ring.[2]

NounEdit

ring ‎(plural ringek)

  1. (dated, boxing) ring, boxing ring (space in which a boxing match is contested)
DeclensionEdit
Inflection (stem in -e-, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative ring ringek
accusative ringet ringeket
dative ringnek ringeknek
instrumental ringgel ringekkel
causal-final ringért ringekért
translative ringgé ringekké
terminative ringig ringekig
essive-formal ringként ringekként
essive-modal
inessive ringben ringekben
superessive ringen ringeken
adessive ringnél ringeknél
illative ringbe ringekbe
sublative ringre ringekre
allative ringhez ringekhez
elative ringből ringekből
delative ringről ringekről
ablative ringtől ringektől
Possessive forms of ring
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. ringem ringjeim
2nd person sing. ringed ringjeid
3rd person sing. ringje ringjei
1st person plural ringünk ringjeink
2nd person plural ringetek ringjeitek
3rd person plural ringjük ringjeik
SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Gábor Zaicz, Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete, Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, ISBN 963 7094 01 6
  2. ^ Tótfalusi István, Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára. Tinta Könyvkiadó, Budapest, 2005, ISBN 963 7094 20 2

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse hringr, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

NounEdit

ring m ‎(definite singular ringen, indefinite plural ringer, definite plural ringene)

  1. ring; a circular piece of material
  2. The ring, place where sports such as boxing takes place
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

ring

  1. imperative of ringe

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hringr, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

NounEdit

ring m ‎(definite singular ringen, indefinite plural ringar, definite plural ringane)

  1. ring; a circular piece of material
  2. The ring, place where sports such as boxing takes place

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

ring

  1. imperative of ringja, ringje, ringa and ringe

ReferencesEdit


Old DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

NounEdit

ring m

  1. ring, circle

DescendantsEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *hringaz

NounEdit

ring m

  1. ring (object in the shape of a circle)

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

ring m (plural rings)

  1. Alternative form of ringue

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English ring.

NounEdit

ring m ‎(Cyrillic spelling ринг)

  1. The ring (place where some sports take place; boxing ring and similar)


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

English

NounEdit

ring m ‎(plural rings)

  1. (boxing) ring

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish ringer, from Old Norse hringr, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ring c

  1. ring; a circular piece of material
  2. The ring, place where sports such as boxing takes place
  3. (mathematics) A ring, algebraic structure
  4. (mathematics) A ring, planar geometrical figure
  5. (astronomy) A ring, collection of material orbiting some planets
  6. Each of the (usually three) years in a Swedish gymnasium (highschool)
    Ann började nyss andra ring.
    Ann recently began her second year at the gymnasium.

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of ring 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ring ringen ringar ringarna
Genitive rings ringens ringars ringarnas

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

ring

  1. imperative of ringa.
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