Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin congius, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱon-. Cognates conch, Ancient Greek κόγχος(kónkhos) and Sanskrit शङ्ख(śaṅkhá), both meaning seashells or a small volume of water, such as might fill one.

NounEdit

 
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congius ‎(plural congii)

  1. (historical units of measure) An ancient Roman unit of volume in liquid measure consisting of six sextarii or one-eighth amphora (about 7 fluid ounces).
  2. (historical units of measure) An ancient Roman unit of weight under Vespasian equal to the weight of a congius of water.

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *ḱon-. Cognates include Ancient Greek κόγχος(kónkhos) and Sanskrit शङ्ख(śaṅkhá).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

congius m ‎(genitive congii); second declension

  1. (historical units of measure) congius, a unit of volume and weight.

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative congius congiī
genitive congiī congiōrum
dative congiō congiīs
accusative congium congiōs
ablative congiō congiīs
vocative congie congiī

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit