English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English volume, from Old French volume, from Latin volūmen (book, roll), from volvō (roll, turn about).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

volume (countable and uncountable, plural volumes)

  1. A three-dimensional measure of space that comprises a length, a width and a height. It is measured in units of cubic centimeters in metric, cubic inches or cubic feet in English measurement.
    The room is 9×12×8, so its volume is 864 cubic feet.
    The proper products can improve your hair's volume.
    • 1997, A. J. Taylor, D. S. Mothram, editors, Flavour Science: Recent Developments[2], Elsevier, →ISBN, page 63:
      Volatiles of kecap manis and its raw materials were extracted using Likens-Nickerson apparatus with diethyl ether as the extraction solvent. The extracts were then dried with anhydrous sodium sulfate, concentrated using a rotary evaporator followed by flushing using nitrogen until the volume was about 0.5 ml.
  2. Strength of sound; loudness.
    Please turn down the volume on the stereo.
    Volume can be measured in decibels.
  3. The issues of a periodical over a period of one year.
    I looked at this week's copy of the magazine. It was volume 23, issue 45.
  4. A bound book.
  5. A single book of a publication issued in multi-book format, such as an encyclopedia.
    The letter "G" was found in volume 4.
  6. (in the plural, by extension) A great amount (of meaning) about something.
  7. (obsolete) A roll or scroll, which was the form of ancient books.
  8. Quantity.
    The volume of ticket sales decreased this week.
  9. A rounded mass or convolution.
  10. (economics) The total supply of money in circulation or, less frequently, total amount of credit extended, within a specified national market or worldwide.
  11. (computing) An accessible storage area with a single file system, typically resident on a single partition of a hard disk.
  12. (bodybuilding) The total of weight worked by a muscle in one training session, the weight of every single repetition summed up.
    (key muscle growth stimuli) Coordinate terms: mechanical tension, frequency

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also edit

cubic distance
sound

Verb edit

volume (third-person singular simple present volumes, present participle voluming, simple past and past participle volumed)

  1. (intransitive) To be conveyed through the air, waft.
    • 1867, George Meredith, chapter 30, in Vittoria[3], volume 2, London: Chapman & Hall, page 258:
      [] thumping guns and pattering musket-shots, the long big boom of surgent hosts, and the muffled voluming and crash of storm-bells, proclaimed that the insurrection was hot.
    • 1885, William Dean Howells, chapter 2, in The Rise of Silas Lapham[4]:
      [] the Colonel, before he sat down, went about shutting the registers, through which a welding heat came voluming up from the furnace.
  2. (transitive) To cause to move through the air, waft.
    • 1872, George Macdonald, chapter 15, in Wilfrid Cumbermede[5], volume I, London: Hurst & Blackett, page 243:
      We lay leaning over the bows, now looking up at the mist blown in never-ending volumed sheets, now at the sail swelling in the wind before which it fled, and again down at the water through which our boat was ploughing its evanescent furrow.
    • 1900, Walter William Skeat, chapter 6, in Malay Magic[6], London: Macmillan, page 420:
      The censer, voluming upwards its ash-gray smoke, was now passed from hand to hand three times round the patient, and finally deposited on the floor at his feet.
    • 1969, Maya Angelou, chapter 33, in I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings[7], New York: Bantam, published 1971, page 219:
      The record player on the first floor volumed up Lonnie Johnson singing, “Tomorrow night, will you remember what you said tonight?”
  3. (intransitive) To swell.

Asturian edit

Noun edit

volume m (plural volumes)

  1. volume

Dutch edit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Middle French volume, from Old French volume, from Latin volūmen.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˌvoːˈly.mə/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: vo‧lu‧me

Noun edit

volume n (plural volumen or volumes, diminutive volumetje n)

  1. volume (three-dimensional quantity of space)
  2. volume (sound level)
  3. (obsolete) volume, book (single book as an instalment in a series)

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Indonesian: volumê

French edit

Etymology edit

From Latin volūmen.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

volume m (plural volumes)

  1. volume (of a book, a written work)
  2. volume (sound)
  3. volume (amount of space something takes up)
  4. volume (amount; quantity)
  5. (figuratively) an overly long piece of writing

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Galician edit

Etymology edit

From Latin volūmen (a book, roll).

Noun edit

volume m (plural volumes)

  1. volume (quantity of space)
  2. volume (single book of a published work)

Indonesian edit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology edit

Internationalism, borrowed from Dutch volume, from Middle French volume, from Old French volume, from Latin volūmen.[1]

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): (standard) /voˈlumə/, (dialectal) /poˈlumə/
  • Rhymes: -mə,
  • Hyphenation: vo‧lu‧mê

Noun edit

volumê (plural volume-volume, first-person possessive volumeku, second-person possessive volumemu, third-person possessive volumenya)

  1. volume:
    1. A three-dimensional measure of space that comprises a length, a width and a height.
    2. loudness: strength of sound.
    3. quantity
      Synonyms: banyaknya, besarnya, bobot
    4. A single book of a publication issued in multi-book format.
      Synonym: jilid
    5. The issues of a periodical over a period of one year.

Derived terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Nicoline van der Sijs (2010) Nederlandse woorden wereldwijd[1], Den Haag: Sdu Uitgevers, →ISBN, →OCLC

Further reading edit

Italian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin volūmen.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /voˈlu.me/
  • Rhymes: -ume
  • Hyphenation: vo‧lù‧me
  • (file)

Noun edit

volume m (plural volumi)

  1. volume (clarification of this definition is needed)

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

  • volume in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Old French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin volūmen (a book, roll).

Noun edit

volume m or f

  1. volume, specifically a collection of written works

Descendants edit

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese volume, borrowed from Latin volūmen.

Pronunciation edit

 
 

  • (Northeast Brazil) IPA(key): /vɔ.ˈlu.mɪ/, /vɔ.ˈlu.m/
  • Hyphenation: vo‧lu‧me

Noun edit

volume m (plural volumes)

  1. (geometry) volume (unit of three-dimensional measure)
  2. volume; loudness (strength of sound)
  3. (publishing) volume (issues of a periodical over a period of one year)
  4. (publishing) volume (individual book of a publication issued as a set of books)
  5. (chiefly historical) volume (bound book)
  6. volume; quantity

Synonyms edit

Related terms edit