Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French couchant.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

couchant ‎(not comparable)

  1. (of an animal) Lying down; crouching.
    • 1874, James Thomson, The City of Dreadful Night, XX
      Two figures faced each other, large, austere;
      A couchant sphinx in shadow to the breast,
      An angel standing in the moonlight clear;
    • 1922, Virginia Woolf, Jacob's Room, Vintage Classics, paperback edition, page 91
      Or again, have you ever watched fine collie dogs couchant at twenty yards' distance?
  2. (heraldry) Represented as lying down with the head raised.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.2:
      His crest was covered with a couchant Hownd, / And all his armour seem'd of antique mould [...].

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

couchant

  1. present participle of coucher

Middle FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

couchant ‎(plural couchans)

  1. present participle of coucher

AdjectiveEdit

couchant m ‎(feminine singular couchante, masculine plural couchans, feminine plural couchantes)

  1. lying down

Old FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

couchant

  1. present participle of couchier

AdjectiveEdit

couchant m ‎(oblique and nominative feminine singular couchant)

  1. lying down