See also: currículum

English edit

 
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Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin curriculum (course), derived from currō (run, move quickly). Doublet of curricle.

Pronunciation edit

  • (General American) IPA(key): /kəˈɹɪkjələm/, /kɚˈɪkjələm/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /kəˈɹɪk.jə.ləm/, /kɜːɹˈɪk.juː.ləm/
  • (file)

Noun edit

curriculum (plural curricula or curriculums)

  1. The set of courses, coursework, and their content, offered at a school or university.
    • 2018, Clarence Green, James Lambert, “Advancing disciplinary literacy through English for academic purposes: Discipline-specific wordlists, collocations and word families for eight secondary subjects”, in Journal of English for Academic Purposes, volume 35, →DOI, page 108:
      Drawing on texts recommended in curricula and controlling for two countries with benchmarked curricula improves the external representativeness of the corpus.
    • 2021 April 16, Ciara Nugent, “The Unexpected Ways Climate Change Is Reshaping College Education”, in Time[1]:
      But as the effects of climate change have become more visible in recent years, and the breadth of the transformation needed to fight it has become clear, law schools, med schools, literature programs, economics departments and more are incorporating climate into their undergraduate curriculums, grappling with how climate will transform their fields and attempting to prepare students to face those transformations in the labor market.
  2. (obsolete) A racecourse; a place for running.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

Basque edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /kurikulum/ [ku.ri.ku.lũm]
  • Rhymes: -ulum
  • Hyphenation: cu‧rri‧cu‧lum

Noun edit

curriculum inan

  1. curriculum
  2. curriculum vitae

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • "curriculum" in Euskaltzaindiaren Hiztegia [Dictionary of the Basque Academy], euskaltzaindia.eus

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

curriculum f (plural curriculums)

  1. curriculum

Further reading edit

Italian edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from Latin curriculum.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /kurˈri.ku.lum/
  • Rhymes: -ikulum
  • Hyphenation: cur‧rì‧cu‧lum
  • (file)

Noun edit

curriculum m

  1. curriculum
  2. curriculum vitae, CV; resume: summary of education and employment experience

Synonyms edit

Related terms edit

Latin edit

Etymology edit

From currō (run, move quickly) +‎ -culum.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

curriculum n (genitive curriculī); second declension

  1. a race
  2. a racecourse
  3. a racing chariot

Declension edit

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative curriculum curricula
Genitive curriculī curriculōrum
Dative curriculō curriculīs
Accusative curriculum curricula
Ablative curriculō curriculīs
Vocative curriculum curricula

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

References edit

  • curriculum”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • curriculum in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • curriculum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • Carl Meißner, Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to finish one's career: vitae cursum or curriculum conficere
  • curriculum in Ramminger, Johann (2016 July 16 (last accessed)) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[3], pre-publication website, 2005-2016