See also: cursèd

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English cursed, cursd, curst, corsed, curset, cursyd, equivalent to curse +‎ -ed.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) enPR: kûrsʹĭd, kûrst, IPA(key): /ˈkɜːsɪd/, /kɜːst/
  • (US) enPR: kûrsʹĭd, kûrst, IPA(key): /ˈkɝsɪd/, /kɝst/, [ˈkʰɝsɪ̈d], [kʰɝst]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)sɪd, -ɜː(ɹ)st
  • Hyphenation: cursed

AdjectiveEdit

cursed (comparative more cursed, superlative most cursed)

  1. Under some divine harm, malady, or other curse.
  2. (obsolete) Shrewish, ill-tempered (often applied to women).
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, Act 2 Scene 1:
      LEONATO. By my troth, niece, thou wilt never get thee a husband, if thou be so shrewd of thy tongue.
      ANTONIO. In faith, she's too curst.
      BEATRICE. Too curst is more than curst: I shall lessen God's sending that way; for it is said, 'God sends a curst cow short horns;' but to a cow too curst he sends none.
  3. hateful; damnable; accursed
    That cursed bird keeps stealing my milk!
  4. (colloquial) Frightening or unsettling.
    • 2016, Brian Feldman, "What Makes a Cursed Image?", New York Magazine, 31 October 2016:
      “Cursed images, to me, leave you with a general uneasy feeling,” the account’s anonymous author told Gizmodo. “There could be certain qualities, like someone looking directly at the camera or an orb floating in the background.”

Alternative formsEdit

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

  • (having some sort of divine harm): blessed
Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Pronunciation 2Edit

VerbEdit

cursed

  1. simple past tense and past participle of curse

Alternative formsEdit

AnagramsEdit