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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, early usage refers simply to lines that do not move, such as one used in angling. Slightly later American usage refers to a boundary in a prison which prisoners must not cross. There is only indirect evidence that the sense of "due date" may be connected with this use of the term in prison camps during the American Civil War, when it referred to a physical line or boundary beyond which prisoners were shot.[1] In fact, the term is no longer found in print by the end of the 19th century, but it soon resurfaces in writing in 1917 as a printing term for a guideline on the bed of a printing press beyond which text will not print. Three years later, the term is found in print in the sense of "time limit" in the closely connected publishing industry, indicating the time after which material would not make it into a newspaper or periodical.[2]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɛdˌlaɪn/
  • (file)

NounEdit

deadline (plural deadlines)

  1. A date on or before which something must be completed.
    I must make this deadline or my boss will kill me!
    • 2019 October, Rhodri Clark, “TfW seeks PRM derogation for Class 37 sets”, in Modern Railways, page 87:
      TfW's [Transport for Wales] plans to meet the PRM [Persons with Reduced Mobility] deadline and withdraw all Pacers by 1 January have been made more difficult by delays to introduction of Class 769 and 230 units.
  2. (archaic) A guideline marked on a plate for a printing press.
  3. (archaic) A line that does not move. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  4. (archaic) A boundary around a prison, prisoners crossing which would be shot.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

deadline (third-person singular simple present deadlines, present participle deadlining, simple past and past participle deadlined)

  1. (military) To render an item non-mission-capable; to ground an aircraft, etc.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Andersonville Prison
  2. ^ “The Mavens' Word of the Day”, in (Please provide the title of the work)[1], accessed 16 October 2013, archived from the original on 16 October 2013

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English deadline.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: dead‧line

NounEdit

deadline m (plural deadlines, diminutive deadlinetje n)

  1. deadline.
    Synonym: termijn

FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English deadline.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdedlɑi̯n/, [ˈde̞dlɑi̯n]

NounEdit

deadline

  1. (colloquial) deadline

DeclensionEdit

The declension of this word is problematic. Joukahainen recommends the nalle-type declension, presumably based on the (English) spelling of the nominative of the word:

Inflection of deadline (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
nominative deadline deadlinet
genitive deadlinen deadlinejen
partitive deadlinea deadlineja
illative deadlineen deadlineihin
singular plural
nominative deadline deadlinet
accusative nom. deadline deadlinet
gen. deadlinen
genitive deadlinen deadlinejen
deadlineinrare
partitive deadlinea deadlineja
inessive deadlinessa deadlineissa
elative deadlinesta deadlineista
illative deadlineen deadlineihin
adessive deadlinella deadlineilla
ablative deadlinelta deadlineilta
allative deadlinelle deadlineille
essive deadlinena deadlineina
translative deadlineksi deadlineiksi
instructive deadlinein
abessive deadlinetta deadlineitta
comitative deadlineineen

On the other hand, the nalle-type declension does not fit the pronunciation, which in fact follows the risti-type declension (except in the nominative: /dedlain/), in other words, /dedlainin/, /dedlainia/, etc. in the genitive, partitive, etc. It's probably advisable to avoid using this word in writing and to use Finnish synonyms instead.

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit