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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French terminer, from Latin termināre. Doublet of terminate.

VerbEdit

termine (third-person singular simple present termines, present participle termining, simple past and past participle termined)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To settle, determine.
    • c. 1385, William Langland, Piers Plowman, I:
      Kynges & kniȝtes · shulde kepe it bi resoun [] Til treuthe had ytermyned · her trespas to þe ende.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To bring to an end; to conclude, terminate.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bishop Hall to this entry?)

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin terminus or the variant termen, termine, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ter- (through)

NounEdit

termine m (plural termini)

  1. end, close
    Synonym: fine
  2. (time) limit, term, date, time
    Synonyms: scadenza, tempo, periodo, limite
  3. term, word
    Synonym: parola
  4. term, condition, main point
    Synonyms: condizione, elemento
  5. (mathematics) term

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

termine

  1. vocative singular of terminus

Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

termine m (oblique plural termines, nominative singular termines, nominative plural termine)

  1. finish; end

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

termine

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of terminar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of terminar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of terminar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of terminar

RomanianEdit

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /terˈmine/, [t̪erˈmine]

VerbEdit

termine

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of terminar.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of terminar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of terminar.