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InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

decano (plural decanos)

  1. dean

ItalianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Late Latin decānus, from Latin decem (“ten”, from the one who was the leader of a group of ten).

NounEdit

decano m (plural decani)

  1. (religion) dean
  2. doyen

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

decile +‎ -ano

NounEdit

decano m (plural decani)

  1. (organic chemistry) decane
Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

decānō

  1. dative singular of decānus
  2. ablative singular of decānus

ReferencesEdit

  • decano in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • decano” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • decano in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[1], pre-publication website, 2005-2016

PortugueseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Late Latin decānus, from Latin decem (ten). Doublet of deão, which was borrowed from Old French.

NounEdit

decano m (plural decanos)

  1. (ecclesiastical) dean (church dignitary)
SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

decano m (plural decanos)

  1. (organic chemistry) decane (aliphatic hydrocarbon isomer having the chemical formula C10H22)

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin decānus, from Latin decem (ten). Doublet of deán (dean), which was borrowed from Old French, and of the archaic or rare Spanish degano (head or administrator of a hacienda in the countryside), which was inherited.

NounEdit

decano m (plural decanos, feminine decana)

  1. senior, eldest person
  2. (organic chemistry) decane

Related termsEdit