decem

LatinEdit

Latin cardinal numbers
 <  IX X XI  > 
    Cardinal : decem
    Ordinal : decimus
    Adverbial : deciēns
    Multiplier : decemplex
    Distributive : dēnī
Latin Wikipedia article on decem

Alternative formsEdit

  • Symbol: X

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *déḱm̥t. Cognates include Sanskrit दश (daśa), Ancient Greek δέκα (deka), Old English tīen (English ten).

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

decem (indeclinable)

  1. (cardinal) ten; 10
    • 100 BCE – 44 BCE, Julius Caesar, Commentarii de Bello Gallico 5.9
      Caesar exposito exercitu et loco castris idoneo capto, ubi ex captivis cognovit quo in loco hostium copiae consedissent, cohortibus decem ad mare relictis et equitibus trecentis, qui praesidio navibus essent []
      Caesar, having disembarked his army and chosen a convenient place for the camp, when he discovered from the prisoners in what part the forces of the enemy had lodged themselves, having left ten cohorts and 300 horse at the sea, to be a guard to the ships, hastens to the enemy []
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Metamorphoses 15.422–423
      sic magna fuit censuque virisque perque decem potuit tantum dare sanguinis annos
      Thus Troy stood great in wealth and men, and for ten years was able to give freely of her blood.
    • 405 CE, Jerome, Vulgate Marcus.10.41
      et audientes decem coeperunt indignari de Iacobo et Iohanne
      And when the ten heard it, they began to be much displeased with James and John.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit

Last modified on 27 March 2014, at 17:23